Our Family History and Ancestry

 

Notes


Matches 7,001 to 7,194 of 7,194

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   Notes   Linked to 
7001 Twin of Ginnor Jr. BISSON Vinnie (I1106)
 
7002 twin of Ray Richmond RICHMOND Fay Henry (I8169)
 
7003 Twin of Vinnie Bisson BISSON Ginnor (I1068)
 
7004 Twin sister of William. She, too, died in infancy. Annable Anne (I53540)
 
7005 twin sister to Harriet. KENDALL Helen M. (I4500)
 
7006 Twin to Benjamin SMITH Joseph (I36902)
 
7007 Twin to Ella. PETTENGILL Emma Liveria (I6474)
 
7008 Twin to Joseph SMITH Benjamin (I36903)
 
7009 Two children. VALLEY David (I9804)
 
7010 Two daughters GABRIEL Gail (I35398)
 
7011 Two daughters ERICKSON Art (I35399)
 
7012 U. S. and International Marriage Records, 1560-1900. Source number: 2475.000; Source type: Electonic Database; Number of pages; 1; Submitter code; JVG. Family F23436
 
7013 Ulmgrens family grave. Nikolai kykogård BEHMER Christina Lovisa (I843)
 
7014 Union Cemetery
2505 Minnehaha
St. Paul, MN
Block 26
Lot 23
Service was on October 15, 1968 by
Mueller Mortuary, Parkway Chapel 
SMITH Sprague W. (I9068)
 
7015 Union Cemetery, Woodbury, Washington Co., MN
Block 26
Lot 23 
SMITH Hazel (I8946)
 
7016 University Hospitals, Iowa City. Bilateral Recurring Pneumonia, Debility due to pancreatic fistula and abdominal abcesses, carcinoma of amulla or ureter. Burial: Mar 11, 1955 in St. Vaclav Catholic Cemetery, Carroll Twp.k, Tama, IA SEBETKA Joseph Frank (I49757)
 
7017 UNKNOWN ROOT Esther (I20234)
 
7018 UNKNOWN ? Elizabeth (I20445)
 
7019 UNKNOWN TILTON Mary (I25338)
 
7020 UNKNOWN Wachter Elyire (I54683)
 
7021 UNKNOWN Morris-Chamberlin Virginia Mary (I54688)
 
7022 UNKNOWN Wachter Charles (I54700)
 
7023 UNKNOWN Family F24732
 
7024 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2141)
 
7025 unmarried PULSIFER Elizabeth Stoell (I7160)
 
7026 unmarried SMITH Molly (I9032)
 
7027 Unmarried but was a scholar at Williams College in Williamstown, MA. He died there at the age of 23. Brown Russell (I51300)
 
7028 Unmarried. MITCHELL Charles C. (I5708)
 
7029 Unmarried. Hopkins Elizabeth (I53494)
 
7030 Unmarried. Hopkins Oceanus (I53616)
 
7031 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I2143)
 
7032 USA/SE of Traer.
Burial Dec. 2, 1933 at St. Vaclay Catholic Cemetery, Carroll Twp., Tama, IA 
SEBETKA Wesley L. (I49761)
 
7033 VA Grants 73, p. 524
Library of Virginia Digital Collection:
Land Office Patents and Grants
==========
Cassandra Davisson
& others
4408 acs
Harrison
Exd.
----------

James Pleasants Esq[ui]re Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia: To all to whom these presents shall come, Greeting: Know Ye, That in conformity with a Survey made on the eighteenth day of October 1798, by virtue of two Land Office Treasury Warrants, to wit: 3000 acres by No. 21,266 & 1408, by No. 21,265 both issued December 13 - 1783 there is granted by the said Commonwealth, unto Cassandra Davisson (wife of Daniel Davisson, Jr., late Cassandra Douglass) Hannah Gallion (wife of Nathan B. Gallion, late Hannah Douglass) Sarah Davisson (wife of Wm. Davission, late Sarah Douglass) and Mary Douglass children & heirs of [-s.?] Douglass decd. ~ A certain Tract or Parcel of Land, containing Four thousand four hundred and eight acres, included in an entry of 8000 acres made Decr. 22 1788, for the said Thomas Douglass, situate in the County of Harrison on the waters of Ohio and Little Kanawha Rivers, and bounded as followeth to wit: beginning at a hickory the third corner to Samuel [----son’s] first survey; thence with a line of the same North 1436 poles, crossing Worthington's creek to a pile of stones, corner to a survey of 400 acres made for Daniel Henrie, thence with the reverse of a line thereof N70?W 370 poles to a post; thence S140 poles to a white oak; N68?W 725 poles to three white oaks; S8?W284 poles to a white oak, S32?E 179 poles to a white oak S3?W 179 poles to a post, N82?W 179 poles to a white oak, S8?W[5?]37 poles to two white oaks, S65[,?]E24 poles to a post N12?E 370 poles to a post; S66?E 400 poles to a hickory, S82?E 178 poles to a hickory, S44?E 550 poles to a white oak, & thence S18?E 400 poles to the beginning To have and to hold the said Tract or Parcel of Land with its appurtenances, to the said Cassandra Davisson, Hannah Gallion, Sarah Davisson & Mary Douglass, children & heirs of Th Douglass decd. and their heirs forever. In witness whereof, the said James Pleasants Esq[ui]re Governor of the Commonwealth of Virginia, hath hereunto set his Hand, and caused the lesser Seal of the said Commonwealth to be affixed at Richmond, on the sixteenth day of Feby in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and twenty five and of the Commonwealth the forty ninth ~ James Pleasants 
DOUGLASS Cassandra (I36103)
 
7034 Vasseur, Charles, the grantee of Park lot No. 6, Tiny, in 1834. He was born at St. Maurice, Quebec, served with the "Voltigeurs,: then went west with the Hudsons Bay Company. He joined the British forces and was at the capture of Mackinaw in 1812. There were six brothers and all went to Mackinaw and followed the British to Drummond Island, thence to Penetanguishene. While at Mackinaw Charles married a young half-breed woman, named Marguerite Langlade, a near relative of the famous Captain Langlade and cousin of the Langlades of Tiny. Charles and several others, under Captain James Darling, walked all the way to Toronto and back during the Rebellion of 1837. He brought the first cow and the first yoke of oxen ever used in Penetanguishene from Georgia, around by Point Mara, the "Narrows" (Orillia) and Coldwater, thence home; the latter portion of the way being only an Indian trail so narrow and bad that he often had to carry the yoke on his shoulders and drive the animals ahead in single file. His mother visited Penetanguishene twice while living at Mackinaw, after which she moved to Green Bay, Wis., where she died. Charles drowned near Manitoulin Island, where his remains are buried. His wife died at Ontonagon, Mich., where is son Louis still lives. He had a family of fifteen children, only the eldest having been born on Drummond Island. I gleaned these reminscences from his son Paul, living at Penetanguishene, who claims that his father had a medal won fighting for the British, but that it has been lost. VASSEUR Charles (I55227)
 
7035 Veterans Hospital MAXWELL B. Hayes (I38562)
 
7036 Victoria C. Hutchinson, Caro, Passed away on Sunday, Jan. 16, 2005, at her daughter's home, at the age of 86. Victoria C. Cybulski was born on Feb. 28, 1918, in Vassar, to the late Anthony and Mary (Koritoski) Cybulski. She married Elden Jan Hurchingson Sr. on Sept. 14, 1935 in Caro. He preceded her in death in 1982. She had been a lifelong resident of Tuscola County. Victoria was a homemaker, and enjoyed gardenting and recipe collecting. Victoria had a great love for her family, as she was a loving wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, as well as a friend. She is survivied by three children; Betty Hutchinson of Caro, Genevieve and Mel McFarland of Caro and Elden Jay and Kay Hutchinson Jr. of Caro;three grandchildren, Bryan and Theresa McCoon of Caro; David Hutchinson of Saginaw and Ryan Hutchinson of Stow, Ohio; two great-grandchildren, Tyler and Travis McCoon of Caro; two sisters-in-law, Alice Marie Cybulski of Cass City and Clara Cybulski of Holly; and several nieces and nephews. In addition to her parents and husband, she was also preceded in death by three sisters, Jennie Brislin, Stella Doherty and Helen Cybulski and three brothers, Zigman, Steve and John Cybulski. Funeral service was held at Collon Funeral Home of Caro on Wednesday, Jan. 19, at 10 a.m. with Pastor Rocky Spears officiating. Burial was in Indianfields Township Cemetery. Memorials may be made to Hospice of Hope, Colwood United Brethren in Christ Church or the Caro Community Hospital Endowment Fund. Tuscola County Advertiser 1-19-2005 CYBULSKI Victoria (I27503)
 
7037 Vina's sister Amanda also ended up in St. Paul. She married Milton W. Taylor born 1854 in Wisconsin, in late 1888 or 89. She maybe had married for the first time in 1878, but at this time I don't know to whom or where. Milton may have children from his first marriage but they had no children together. He also worked for the railroad as a car repainter. They lived at #925 Fremont St., St. Paul. They witnessed the marriage of George Smith and Vina Pulsifer on April 17th, 1888, at the Ramsey County Courthouse in St. Paul, Minnesota. Lorraine talked many times of visisting Aunt and Uncle Taylor, because they lived close to the Smith home on 3rd Street. When she and her brother Bob were all dressed up for their 1st Communion they were taken to see Aunt and Uncle Taylor. Uncle Taylor answered the door and wanted to know who the bride and groom were, a happy memory for a little girl. TAYLOR Milton W. (I37218)
 
7038 Virginia and Wiliam, of Williamsport, PA married at Long Island City, NY
Oct. 7, 1891. 
Clarke William Packer (I53581)
 
7039 Vital Records Extracted from the Yates County Chronicle Editor: Stafford C. Cleveland January - April 1871
5 January 1871 Died at his residence in Dresden on Monday, January 2, 1871, Luther Sisson, at the age of seventy-seven years and five days. [He] was the son of George Sisson and his wife Bethany Luther, natives of Rhode Island. His parents were firm and devoted members of the Friend’s Society, and his birth Dec. 27, 1793, is said to have been the third in the Friend’s Settlement. He was the youngest of the children. His brothers were Benoni and Jonathan, and his sisters Lydia and Lament. Benoni married Mary Meek, and was the father of James and John Sisson of Jerusalem. Jonathan married Catharine Vosbinder, and was the father of six children, among whom is Harrison H. Sisson of Jerusalem. Lydia married Isaac Prosser, and has a son living in Torrey. Lament was the wife of Richard Hayes. George Hayes, her son, resides in Dresden…. [Luther Sisson] married Sarah Maria, sister of Wright Brown of Torrey, who is still living. They had one son, Charles H. Sisson, who resides at Dresden. 
Brown Sarah Marie (I52741)
 
7040 Vital Records Extracted from the Yates County Chronicle Editor: Stafford C. Cleveland January - April 1871
5 January 1871 Died at his residence in Dresden on Monday, January 2, 1871, Luther Sisson, at the age of seventy-seven years and five days. [He] was the son of George Sisson and his wife Bethany Luther, natives of Rhode Island. His parents were firm and devoted members of the Friend’s Society, and his birth Dec. 27, 1793, is said to have been the third in the Friend’s Settlement. He was the youngest of the children. His brothers were Benoni and Jonathan, and his sisters Lydia and Lament. Benoni married Mary Meek, and was the father of James and John Sisson of Jerusalem. Jonathan married Catharine Vosbinder, and was the father of six children, among whom is Harrison H. Sisson of Jerusalem. Lydia married Isaac Prosser, and has a son living in Torrey. Lament was the wife of Richard Hayes. George Hayes, her son, resides in Dresden…. [Luther Sisson] married Sarah Maria, sister of Wright Brown, Jr. of Torrey, who is still living. They had one son, Charles H. Sisson, who resides at Dresden.


Luther Sisson's obituary in the "Yates County Chronicle" 5 January 1871: Luther Sisson (77 years and 5 days) died at his home in Dresden, January 2, 1871. He was the son of George and his wife Bethany Luther Sisson, natives of Rhode Island. His parents were firm and devoted members of the Friend's Society [led by "the Friend" Jemima Wilkinson, not to be confused with the Society of Friends, the Quakers], and his birth Dec 27, 1793, is said to have been the third in the Friend's Settlement. He was the youngest of the children. His brothers were Benoni and Jonathan, and his sisters Lydia and Lament. Benoni married Mary Meek, and was the father of John and James Sisson of Jerusalem. Jonathan married Catherine Vosbinder and was the father of six children, among whom is Harrison H. Sisson of Jerusalem. Lydia married isaac Prosser and has a son living in Torrey. Lament was the wife of Richard Hayes. George Hayes, her son, lived in Dresden. Luther Sisson grew up under the immediate influence of the Friend's Society, attending the meetings with his parents. In conversation with the writer of this notice in 1868, he spoke with the highest respect of the Friend, and declared in the most emphatic terms that he held statements adverse to her integrity to be utterly false. Mr. Sisson was one of the early school teachers having commenced at the age of 19 in Larzelere Hollow in Jerusalem in 1812. He taught school several years, and was at one time a clerk in the store of William Huston at Eddytown. He married Sarah Maria, sister of Wright Brown, Jr. of Torrey who is still living. They had a son, Charles H. Sisson, who resides at Dresden. Mr. Sisson was in his more vigorous years a man of activity and quietness of thought, and nearly always held some town office. In 1854 and 1855 he was supervisor of the Town of Torrey. As a constable he frequently attended court at Canandaigua, before Yates County was erected, and took a number of persons to jail there when imprisonment for debt was the law of the land. He was a Justice of the Peace, a teacher, merchant, and farmer by turns, and lived to a good old age, retaining his mental vivacity to the lastest period. He was a descendant of Richard and Mary Sisson of 1608 ca. 
Sisson Luther (I52744)
 
7041 Vital Records say she died five months after John was born. (July 19, 1673) Annable Hannah (I53130)
 
7042 Vol 23 Pg 371 - Joseph LEGRIS (dit) PRISQUE, 21, laborer, Penetanguishene, Victoria Harbor, s/o Piere & Angelique LEGRIS (dit) PRISQUE, married Catherine VASSEUR, 19, Penetanguishene, Victoria Harbor, d/o Charles & Margaret. WitnJ. Baptiste MORIN, Victoria Harbor, & Mary GENDRON, Penetanguishene. May 8, 1871 Catholic Church, Penetanguishene. (RC).(MS-932, Reel 7, page 371) Family F24927
 
7043 Vol. 1, p. 37 Source (S1553)
 
7044 Volney was one of the brothers appointed to build the Second Baptist Church of the town of Stillwater, Saratoga County, NY. Newland Volney B. (I52186)
 
7045 Walter Capron was a farmer and forgeman.1 During his Military Service he: Served as a private in Capt. Stephen Richardson's company at the Rhode Island Alarm.
Served as a private in the 2nd Mass. Regiment. 
CAPRON Walter (I39834)
 
7046 Walter died on 5 Feb. 1974 while attending the funeral of his brother, Ray in California. Paddock Walter (I52842)
 
7047 War veteran.
Married
Trucked for M Hardy Co's St. Paul house 
BISSON Robert (I1099)
 
7048 Was "of Topsfield" when married. She 1st married Amos Andrews, then
married to John Potter as Widow Andrews; and 3rd mar. Nathaniel Grant
Spiller as widow Mehitable Potter. 
WILDES Mehitable (I10110)
 
7049 Was a cabinet maker. HASKELL Augustus (I3858)
 
7050 Was a Judge. Resided inKalamazoo, Mi. SEVERENS Henry F. (I8538)
 
7051 Was a lieutenant in the Revolutionary War and who had a remarkable military career.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
Lieutenant Edward Annable
1753-1836
Revolutionary War Campaigner

On March 11, 1948, Mr. F. R. Blair of General Motors Overseas Operations, New York, wrote about Lieut. Edward Annable, his Revolutionary ancestor, and loaned the following letter, circa 1887, to Anthony Anable (9th generation) to be copied. This letter was written by Fernando C. Annable, son of Lieut. Annable, to Desire Fuller Ormsby, his niece. She was the grandmother of Mr. Blair.
----------------------

Letter from Fernando C. Annable to his niece, Desire Fuller Ormsby, circa 1887:

"Respected Niece-
Go back in your imaginaion to colonial days-so far that the mist of time makes many things obscure and tradition may magnify the facts--there lived two girls, Dolly Dimick and her sister, Desire Dimick, belles of Boston. Dolly married John Ellis, Jr., and Desire married Samuel Annable, Jr. They moved to Ashfield (New York) and were farmers. This John Ellis, Jr. and Dolly Dimick had a son Dimick Ellis, who married his cousin, Polly Annable, the daughter of Samuel Annable, Jr., both of whom died in Sempronius (New York),and the first funeral I remember of going to was hers. She was over ninety when she died and now I am eighty-two. (This will give you some idea of time.)

"This Dimick Ellis and Polly Annable had a son, who is now living in Brooklyn (New York) and has become wealthy in the oil trade. He has written many pamphlets on the new dispensation of Swedenborg (as he calls it ) and last summer went to Europe, and lectured in one of their institutions. He has sent me a number of his books. He is Puritan, purified by Swendenborg. I never saw him but think he is older than I am by a few years. You can easily find him, and he will be delighted to see you.

"Your Grandfather, Edward Annable (my father) was eighteen years old when the battle of Lexington was fought and, as soon as he heard the news, he went down to Boston (about 70 miles) and enlisted for a short time, and was at the battle of Bunker Hill. He had some powder and three bullets and one of them was a pewter one. (This I heard him say often.) His father was a Tory, and, when he heard that Edward had enlisted, he hoped he would never come back. (This last item my mother told me.)

"Now I will relate what I have heard him relate of the Stony Point attack and surrender. When the men for that attack were called for, the regiment to which he belonged was paraded in a straight line and it was announced by an officer (I think Anthony Wayne, but am not sure) that a certain expedition was required and of so dangerous a nature that it would be no disgrace to any soldier should he decline it, but all who desired to be detailed might shoulder arms. All arms were shouldered. Then an officer passed along the line and touched every other man, saying to him, "Advance". This new line was told again that the expedition was a dangerous one, and it should be no disgrace to decline, but no one would decline, and no one thought of Stony Point.

"Out of these men so detailed, a forlorn hope (as father called it) were drawn by ballot to carry axes to cut away the abates. There was a Virginian who was not drawn on the forlorn hope, who told a soldier who was drawn, that his father, who was a planter in Virginia would honor any draft he might draw on him which he would give him, to have his chance in the forlorn hope. This was refused and the Virginian haughtily turned round and said, "I have ever been unfortunate from birth. I have reason to curse my wayward stars. I came within one of dying on the field of honor." Father told me this story more than once when I was a small boy, and it made such an impression on me, to think that a man wanted to die in battle, that I have remembered it until now.

"Father was on guard in camp and could distinctly hear the cannon, but did not know where it was. After the expedition had gone out, which everybody knew but did not know what for, Washington was seen walking forward and back in very measured steps. When the cannon was heard he stopped, stood motionless until it ended, and then walked rapidly to his quarters and was not seen again that night. The next morning a messenger brought the news of the surrender. It was then that father's company, or a detail from the regiment (I don't know which), was ordered to Stony Point to relieve Wayne and his men. When he went in to the fort, the clotted blood was to be seen on the ground and looked like butchering hogs (as he expressed it to me).

"Father first enlisted for a short period and subsequently for the duration of the war. He never took a furlough, but continued in the service till the close of the war. I do not know at what time he became a lieutenant, but the only captain I ever heard him speak of was Captain Wigglesworth, a Prussian officer, highly educated, who brought many books with him and came over with Lafayette. He had served under Frederick, the Great. He was a very courteous gentleman, well beloved in camp, but a tyrant on parade. From him I think father obtained his education, which was considerable, especially in writing and Roman history.

"Father was one of the detailed guard that conducted (Major) Andre to the gallows, and who stood close by. He distincly heard his last words. I will tell you the story as he told it to me.

"He was a slim man and had a long neck, and, after taking off his neck handkerchief, he took out three pins from his collar and wove them into his coat sleeve very nicely. His hand trembled while doing it. He was blindfolded and his arms were very loosely tied behind him. Then Colonel Schamel said to him, "if he had anything to say, he could say it now" Then, with some little effort, he raised the handkerchief from his eyes and said, "Gentlemen, I wish you to bear me witness that I meet my fate like a brave man." Then turning towards Colonel Schamel said, "Gentlemen, you may proceed". (These last words were not in the proof sheets you saw and I have called the writer's attention to it).

"Father was in the battle of Saratoga, but I never heard him say much about it, that I remember, more than that there was firing going on at different times for three days. He was in the battle of Brandywine, but I do not remember that he said much about that, but often spoke of it and of Lafayette who he thought was a brilliant young man and did well that day. He was not at Yorktown when Cornwallis surrendered, but was left under (General) Putnam with the New England troops to watch New York City, which that general always wanted to attack and was always importuning Washington to do, and was discontented because he was denied the privilege of doing so.

"The battle of Monmouth is a long story as he told it to me. I have never written it before, nor have I told it to my children, but this is what he said about it. It was the hottest day he ever saw, and his regiment went into that battle in their shirt sleeves. They piled their coats on the ground and a guard was placed over them. He was in Lee's division who made the first and abortive attack, for which Lee was censured so severely by Washington. His division again marched forward to the front and received the enemy's fire until they retreated. Following up their retreat was terrible suffering. The enemy filled up the wells behind them. There were no streams nor water to be had and men fell out of the ranks exhausted. On this retreat they found (I think) seven dead Hessions in the shade of an apple tree, who wore their uniforms buttoned up, as on parade, who were not wounded, but had died of heat.

"Father said he saw much of Washington that day, galloping his horse about the field, stopping for a few moments in one place and going to another for a few seconds. At one time he stopped, then he galloped off to some other place. I have heard him say that some soldiers died of drinking water, but nothing about Washington's care for them, but probably other officers took care of their soldiers, who knew the danger. I remember that it was thought the heat and fatigue of that day caused his fever sore, and it may be true, but I now think it was probably due to another cause, and I will give you my reason.

"Washington wanted to remove the army sixty miles distant. (I do not remember when nor where.) There was no enemy on the route, and the men were told they might break ranks and go as they pleased. A strife got up to see who would go the farthest, and father was one of the few who went through the first day. He carried his musket, cartridge box with twelve rounds of powder and balls, his canteen, three day's provisions, and all the clothes he wore for one year. Twice he performed a similar feat. My mother said he had for years varicose veins, or bunches, as she called them, in the veins many years before they broke out into a sore-but this is beside the question.

"All these stories were told to me while a small boy, often to keep me at work. He taught me the letter which Andre wrote to Washington to change the mode of his death, which I can repeat yet, and when I was old enought to read them in history I was greatly surprised to find them printed, for I really supposed that father and I were the only persons that knew it.

"Now I have written you a great deal of history that will do you no good if you take the trouble to read it, and it will do you but little hurt if you never tell of it, and I promise never to do it again.

Yours Sincerely,
(signed) F. C. Annable





In the Federal Census of 1790 for Ashfield, Essex County, MA, Lt. Edward and perhaps his father, Samuel are shown living next door to each other. Edward is shown having 1 male16 years and older, including head of household and 5 females in his household.

Samuel has four males 16 years and older, and three females living in his household, also in Ashfield,
Essex County, MA.

Edward Annable, (1753-1836), served as ensign in the Thirteenth Mass. regiment and was promoted lieutenant, 1780. He served to the close of the war in the Continental Line. He was born in Barnstable, Mass. The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution Volume 18 page 25

Lt. Edward was buried on 10 June, 1836 so he probably died two days before. These dates are from the cemetery records of Marcellus, NY. On his tombstone it says he was a Guard at the execution of Major Andre in the Rev. War. 
Annable Lt. Edward (I53679)
 
7052 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I5342)
 
7053 Was a physician; followed his brother to
California, purchased a tract of land in
Colusa County, Cal. (His. of Plymouth). 
PULSIFER Joseph (I7502)
 
7054 Was a St. Paul Police Officer.

Lived with E. and Clara Erickson in St. Paul, Minnesota.
From the St. Paul City Directory 1912, he lived at 586 W 7th St., St. Paul and worked as a messenger form M. F. Patterson Dental Co.
St. Paul City Directory 1914, he lived at 313 W. Central and was an apprentice. 
LEEDOM Calbert Harry (I12515)
 
7055 Was a teacher FREEMAN Lillian G. (I40086)
 
7056 Was a twin to sister, Juliette Eunice (Ettie) Brown. Brown John Henry (I53002)
 
7057 Was a wagon maker by trade. MCCLAIN John (I5513)
 
7058 was age 87 yrs. on 1850 census SIMONDS Elijah (I8851)
 
7059 Was an Episcopelien minister.

Reverend Clement H. Beaulieu

Bayfield Progress Newspaper
Bayfield, WI
Tuesday, October 16, 1916

Reverend Clement H. Beaulieu, of Le Sueur, Minnesota, has revisited the place of his birth. Though well past man's allotted span of life and without any particular pull from those "fond recollections" of which the he speaks he has entertained longing to once again see the region were the days of his childhood were spent. Accompanying friends to Ashland, he seized the opportunity afforded him, came to the city Friday and crossed by boat to Madeline Island, setting foot once again upon the soil not trod during a period of 68 years.
Reverend Beaulieu’s father, whose name was identical with the sons, was stationed on Madeline Island for some years as agent for American Fur Company, the great early day corporation which builded the fortune that the New York Astor family have since been adding to and spending.
The island post, a fort like structure, was attached to what the corporation new as the Fond du Lac District, the headquarters being at the head of Lake Superior where the city of Duluth has since come into being. In log-walled room within the Madeline island fort the claimant was born in on a rigorous night in January twenty-year 1841. There, except for occasional family excursions to Fond du Lac, he remained (a brother and sister being his only playmates, except for the Indian children who lived on the island or whom crossed occasionally from the mainland with their fur-bartering parents) until 1848, in which year the family removed.
In the old, and now overgrown, burial ground that it joined the company post repose the bones of Reverend Clements’s paternal grandfather and those of his father's brother, both of whom died there while in service of the fur company. There also are the graves of the two Beaulieu children who died while the family lived on the island. These graves the visitor of last Friday found and to them he gave some attention. The lapse of years in the long lack of attention has resulted in the following of the marking slab's and in the partial obliteration of the inscriptions; but the most noticeable evidence of the passage of time was seen in the tree of body-large size that had grown squarely in the center of the graves of grandfather Beaulieu.
>From Madeline Island the family went to Minnesota, finally finding location in St. Paul when civilization had created such a place. The Reverend Beaulieu attended school, going finally to Elizabeth town, New Jersey, and in finishing just his schoolwork at Fay Academy. Entering his own ministry in the Protestant Episcopal Church, he has since served continuously in that work, that service being rendered chiefly within the state of Minnesota.
>From the state his brother Charles served with distinction and gallantry as captain of a company in the ninth Minnesota infantry during the Civil War. Despite his years of reverent Beaulieu is still vigorous somebody and agile of mind and, though there is no left in all this region practically nothing (not even the lands contour) to be recognized as of the long-ago, he greatly enjoyed his brief visit. [End] 
BEAULIEU Rev. Clement H. (I791)
 
7060 Was baptized by Rev. H.G. Hackman. MCCLAIN Amos McGumery (I5500)
 
7061 was buried the next day, as "the Serien widow." DELAVOYE Marie Marguerite (I4936)
 
7062 Was buried with Richard REED Eunice (I40015)
 
7063 Was Clarion in Cheboygan County when they got married? Family F24366
 
7064 Was cremated BRUSTMANN Lillian Angeline Lavila (I34602)
 
7065 was divorced, unknown BROWN Hazel Marie (I1548)
 
7066 Was from Crookston, MN Diocese.

Reverend Louis studied in Three Rivers, Canada; ordained where he
served at Corcoran at St Anne's and Our Lady of Lourdes 1880 to
1884. He left to enter the archdiocese of New York.
Father Chandonnet built his home on Fish Lake, raised a large garden
and many kinds of fruit trees. People came from all over to see his
place that he named "Port Mourice." 
CHANDONNET Zepherin Louis (I1936)
 
7067 Was he born in Ware? or Enfield, Hartford County, CT?

DAR listing: Ancestor # A0 15915

Massachusetts Patriotic Service
Birth 30 March 1742 Enfield, Hartford County, CT
Death(Post) 5 August 1807, Troy, NY
Service Description: 1) PVT CAPT.AARON ROWLEY,COL.JOHN BROWN 2) LOANED MONEY TO THE GOVERNMENT 
BROWN Timothy (I1627)
 
7068 Was know to his nieces and nephews as "Uncle Jack". Burgess Benjamin (I52204)
 
7069 Was known as "Lieut."; served as selctman in rockingham 1811-1814
Buried rockingham Meeting House Cem. 
PULSIFER Samuel Wood (I7893)
 
7070 was listed as born 07 Oct 1888 EDMONDSON Charles Hewitt (I42813)
 
7071 was listed as died: 28 Mar 1821 FAIRCHILD Harriet Mehitable (I42930)
 
7072 Was Lt. in Rev. War; listed on pay roll of Capt. Ezekiel Colby's Co.
1777-1781 
SILLOWAY Hezekiah (I8724)
 
7073 Was married by Rev. Joseph Vail of Hadlyme, CT Annable Henry (I53496)
 
7074 Was naturalized in 1731 and was a weaver by trade, and in Mennonite
history is represented as a minister of the gospel. He preached in
Skippack and in Germantown.
He made his last will and testament in writing dated Feb. 7, 1763 of
the township of Perkiomen and Skippack. 
ZIEGLER Michael (I10305)
 
7075 Was related to James Brown (Jr.) but relationship is unknown.
After marriage Ellen and Patrick and their children moved to
Minnesota with James Brown (Jr.) and Mary Anne Goggin. 
BROWN Ellen (I1532)
 
7076 was still living in 1853. FREEMAN Jerry (I3120)
 
7077 Was wounded in the Civil War and refused to have his leg amputated. BLACKMER Lewis W. (I40107)
 
7078 Washington Post.
Monday, February 28, 2000; Page B06

Barbara Anne Ames Dies at Age 78
Barbara Anne Ames, 78, a contracting officer and negotiator as a civilian with the Marine Corps from the
early 1950s to early 1970s, died of pneumonia Feb. 22 at Northern Virginia Community Hospital. She lived in
Alexandria. In the early 1970s, she worked briefly as a Navy Department contracting officer and negotiator.
Ms. Ames, who was born in New Orleans, received bachelor's and master's degrees in business
administration from George Washington University. She toured with her five sisters as a dancing group in the
1930s before joining the Marine Corps in 1943. She was discharged as a master sergeant in1952.
After retiring from her civilian career in the 1970s, she volunteered as a tax consultant for the American
Association of Retired Persons. Her memberships included the Capitol Dog Training Club and the Women
Marines Association. She was a past vice president and treasurer of St. Anthony's Catholic Church women's
guild in Falls Church.
Survivors include four sisters, Dorothy Javorsky of Lakeland, Fla., Marjorie Murphy of Wayne, N.J., and
Alice Bimbi and Mary Eloise Little, both of Staunton, Va.; and a brother, Frank Ames of Stow, Mass. 
AMES Barbara Anne (I40209)
 
7079 Wayne was born in Momence, IL, the third child and second son of Delia O'Connell and John Wilson, Jr. He went to one-room country schools and attended Momence High School.

He served in WWII in the Army Air Corp and was stationed at Chenute Field for a time. He was then sent to the Aleutian Islands.

Wayne was always working with his hands...he loved making things. In the service when plastic was first on the market, he made his niece, Sonja, a beautiful clear plastic heart that had a red interior, looking much like tiny veins. He also made himself a false tooth when he had a tooth that needed a crown instead of going to have it fixed by a dentist!

After he was discharged from the service, he returned to Grant Park, married and started an electrical business with his younger brother, Gaylord. They were known for miles around as the Wilson Bros. Electrical Contractors.

His love for making things extended to the making of wonderful, custom guns. These were muzzle-loaders made to exact replicas of days past. Every part of the gun, down to the screws were made by hand. His most prized possession was a muzzle-loader he had made and later willed it to his favorite niece, Sonja Mortensen, daughter of his sister, Ruby. Sonja has since given it to her only son, Raymond Black, to keep it in the family.

Wayne was the quiet one, unlike his siblings. He was serious, thoughtful and also very caring.

He had for sometime, been very ill. The doctor in Grant Park was treating him for a liver ailment. The area under his right lung was swollen. When his nephew, Dr. John Mortensen came to visit him and checked him over, he discovered the real problem was a severe heart condition and he was in heart failure. Wayne was taken immediately to the VA hospital where a pacemaker was implanted just under the skin. His nephew had saved his life for many more years. He regained his energy and strength after years of suffering from this unknown heart condition.

The misdiagnosis would not be the last in this family. The same doctor in Grant Park also misdiagnosed his brother, Jack, a few years later that resulted in his untimely death.

His Social Security number is 354-28-7240 issued in IL. 
Wilson Wayne Elwood (I53032)
 
7080 We find no record of this marriage, but according to the will of her
great-aunt, Hannah Swift, it says, to the only heir of my deceased
sister, Lucy Pike, to Lucy Chase, wife of Warren C. Chase. 
PIKE Lucy Ann (I6538)
 
7081 Wed in Henryville church in Renville county. Married over 50 years Family F3039
 
7082 Wellsboro Agitator, Tioga, PA-- Wednesday, October 9, 1912 Charles Bulkley, one of the best known farmers of the Cowanesque valley, died at his home in Osceola on Sept. 28, at 7 o'clock, following an illness of several months. He was born on the farm where he died, Nov. 25, 1827, and would have been 85 years old the 25th of the coming November. He was the son of Ira Bulkley and succeeded his father to the home farm and he also acquired by purchase the larger part of his grandfather's estate which gave him about 500 acres. He is survived by his third wife, also 2 daughters, Mrs Myra Tubbs, widow of the late Henry Tubbs, of Osceola and Carrie, wife of Dr. F. F. Knapp of Elkland. Buckley Charles (I51709)
 
7083 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I4714)
 
7084 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3639)
 
7085 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I3640)
 
7086 Went to California about 1850 to get enough gold to buy a farm. Wrote
that he had the money and gave the date of his return. He never
arrived and is believed to have been murdered. 
PULSIFER William S. (I8067)
 
7087 Went to Canada; returned to Pa. and died there
that same year. His widow returned to
Can. and married there John Baumann. 
SHOEMAKER John Schantz (I8609)
 
7088 went to Salem, Ma. abt. 1637 PLASSE William (I6592)
 
7089 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F24671
 
7090 Westminster, Middlesex, England? of ENGLAND Henry Plantagenet III; King (I2683)
 
7091 WFT est 1579-1618 COOPER Thomas (I39510)
 
7092 WFT Est 1579-1618 COOPER Judith (I39515)
 
7093 WFT est 1612-1641 SMITH Henry (I39508)
 
7094 WFT est 1621-1644 COOPER Elizabeth (I39509)
 
7095 WFT est 1621-1699 COOPER Thomas (I39510)
 
7096 WFT est 1638-1681 Family F19527
 
7097 WFT est 1666-1726 SMITH Henry (I39508)
 
7098 WFT est 1666-1732 COOPER Elizabeth (I39509)
 
7099 WFT est 1742-1789 HEALY Samuel (I3922)
 
7100 WFT est 1742-1792 CHADWICK Rebecca (I1875)
 
7101 WFT est. 1540-1591 COOPER Thomas (I39512)
 
7102 WFT Est. 1566-1625 Family F19529
 
7103 WFT Est. 1572-1615 SMITH Henry (I39514)
 
7104 WFT est. 1579-1669 COOPER Thomas (I39512)
 
7105 WFT est. 1604-1655 Family F19528
 
7106 WFT Est. 1612-1644 GREEN Phebe (I39517)
 
7107 WFT Est. 1612-1696 SMITH Henry (I39514)
 
7108 WFT Est. 1612-1702 COOPER Judith (I39515)
 
7109 WFT ESt. 1667-1732 GREEN Phebe (I39517)
 
7110 WFT Est. 1759-1799 Family F19532
 
7111 WFT Est. 1763-1789 HEALY William (I39527)
 
7112 WFT Est. 1815-1874 HEALY William (I39527)
 
7113 When first married, they lived with his brother, Daniel P. M. Davison, near the head of Second Pond. Afterwards, he bought a farm on the east side of Long Pond, in Grafton, NY, where he resided several years. Aunt Fanny Parks, a maiden sister of Aunt Sally Parks-Davison, made her home with them all the rest of her life, and went with them to Illinois, where she died.

He lived on a very rough, stoney farm. The great stone heaps and stone walls he built are a tribute to his strength and energy. He always took a great interest in religious matters, being a Deacon in the Baptist Church. In politics, he was a Jackson Democrat and held the highest offices in the town. He was for several years Captain of the Grafton Rifle Co., of New York State.

Socially, Uncle Milton's was one of the best places in the world to go visiting. They were always so kind and pleasant. They left the farm and kept the Quackenskill Hotel for awhile before they came to Illinois in 1855. In fact, all the Davisons have left OLD GRAFTON, where our branch of the Davison Family originated. I was there a few years ago, and there was not one there, and no relatives, except by marriage in town. (Written by A. A. Davison in 1905)

Milton came to Illinois and took up land west of Minonk, on Grand Prarie. came from rocks and stones of OLD GRAFTON, to where you could seldom find a stone large enough to throw at a bird. Tell that in Grafton, and you would find our veracity at stake. He showed the same dilligence and perserverance that he did in Grafton, and soon established another homestead, and by hard work and increased value of land, acquired a large fortune. Aunt Sally Parks-Davison died May 27, 1885. He then lived with his children about ten years, to the good old age of 83 years, 6 months, and passed away March 19, 1895, after a life well spent in Church, Sunday School, State and Home.

They are buried in the Yankee Town Cemetery, eight miles west of Minonk, Illinois. 
DAVISON John Milton (I35661)
 
7114 When I was a little girl my grandmother, Araminta, used to say that her grandmother was a witch. A good witch mind you. She was apparently a mid-wife and herbalist and she "sat with the dead" after the formal wake was over. She was apparently a respected healer in her community of Castine. She had a "big black book of herbal lore and "spells" that Gram used to mention was taken by the "Green side of the family". Flora was married twice, first to a man whose last name was Green and lastly to my Great-Great Grandfather, Amos J. Perkins.

The psychic part comes in when her second husband was lost at sea. She was apparently upstairs in her little house in Castine when she heard some coach wheels and a horse pull up at the house. She looked out the window and saw a black coach and horse with a single lit lantern swinging in front. Knowing that this was the coach that sent messages of loved ones lost at sea, she knew that her husband Amos was dead.

She went downstairs to greet the messenger formally, but when she got to the front door, the coach had disappeared! A few days later the real coach showed up and she knew that what she had seen was a "sending". Pretty spooky, huh? I guess it's a little late for Halloween...By the way, the story was passed from Flora's daughter Minta to my grandmother to me. Minta apparently had a reputation for telling a pretty mean ghost story. 
GRINDLE Flora H. (I38233)
 
7115 When Joseph was 35 years old he married a cousin, Mary Snow. He lived to be 88 years old.

When Joseph was 35 years old he married a cousin, Mary Snow. He lived to be 88 years old. 
Snow Joseph (I53364)
 
7116 When Sarah was 23 years of age, she married William Walker, in Eastham. Sarah lived to be 65 years old.

When Sarah was 23 years of age, she married William Walker, in Eastham. Sarah lived to be 65 years old. 
Snow Sarah (I53356)
 
7117 while repairing a mill dam in Rockingham PULSIFER Samuel Wood (I7893)
 
7118 Widow Mary Hannah Brown Farr remarried to Col. A. T. Dunton by Rev. F. Frothingham of Brattleboro, VT on February 7, 1867 in Brattleboro. Dunton Col. Augustus T. (I51255)
 
7119 Widow of ----------Lambert SOULINIER Mary (I9137)
 
7120 Widow of Daniel Mixer MIXER Lydia (I5763)
 
7121 widow of Dr. Robert Semple COOPER Frances (I2117)
 
7122 Wife of William Sr. ? Moore Mary (I54083)
 
7123 WILES WHITE PAPER PROJECT NO. 5 - “D” Schultz Northern Michigan Family History


Charles Wachter, Jr.
Mackinac Island Fur Trader-Native American Roots Twice Verified by Daughters' DNA
...by Marie Rundquist and Richard Wiles

Mackinac Island on Lake Huron is central to the histories of North America's fur-trading industry in the the 18th and 19th centuries and the Wachter, Fraser, Fisher, and Farlinger (also known as Farling and McFarland) families of northern Michigan. On Mackinac Island, a 3.8 square mile spit of land located at the “tip of the mitten,” mid-way between Michigan's Upper and Lower Peninsulas, the North American fur-trading industry found its nexus, and a culture, comprised of Canadian fur-traders and their Native American wives, had its beginnings.

At the root of this family genealogy and cultural heritage is grandmother “Nancy-Anne Fraser,” whose storied, Scottish surname evokes discussion of John Fraser, a founding partner in Canada's McTavish, Fraser and Co. -- chief suppliers and fur brokers for the legendary North West Company. According to Harry Duckworth, John Fraser had engaged in Canadian business affairs throughout his career, traveling between London and Canada to restore a failed financial position while under the firm of Fraser and Young. John's association with the North American fur-trading industry began in earnest in the early 1790s, when he was at the mid-point of his life, and the McTavish, Fraser and Company was founded 1.

Based in Montreal, Fraser's company engaged in commerce with Mackinac Island fur trading society 2, fostering the inter-dependency of the two regions: with Mackinac Island serving as a supplier of furs and Montreal acting as its agent and vital link to the markets of Europe 3. In addition to his wife, Jeanne McKenzie, and two daughters, Justina and Mary, John Fraser had three sons: James, John (whom he helped place on the board of supervisors of the amalgamation of fur-trading giants, the North West and Hudson Bay Companies), and another who became a priest. According to Duckworth, daughter Mary married an unrelated, “James Fraser of Belladrum 4.” Through his partnership with McTavish, Fraser, and Company, John Fraser had in his later years, re-gained his fortune, established a Fraser family legacy in the North American fur-trading business, and he died in 1825, at the age of eighty-three. 5

In the early 1790s, when the McTavish, Fraser and Company was gaining a foot-hold in the local fur-trading economy, “Nancy-Anne Fraser,” of unknown parentage, was born. According to her husband's military records, Nancy-Anne Fraser was a half-breed, a “Metis,” of Anishinaabe (Ottawa (ODAWA)- Chippewa (Ojibwa)) and European (Scottish) ancestry. The Metis culture on Mackinac Island was born of the Native American “country wives,” and the Canadian fur-traders they never “officially” married, but with whom they had first or second families. This kinship-centered, social structure, an integral component of the fur-traders' economic sphere, survived and thrived on Mackinac Island, despite the political struggles between the United States and Britain in the late 18th century 6.

Family genealogy has, that in 1814, Nancy-Anne Fraser married James Farlinger, a blacksmith born in Ontario; she and her husband began their family on the nearby Drummond Island, following the


James Wachter
settlement patterns of other fur-trading families who sought British protection after the War of 1812. Daughters Marie (born 1824), Josephee (Josette) (1815), Elizabeth (1817) and Nancy (1819), were of an age to have attended a Protestant mission school, established on Mackinac Island, for the purpose of educating Indian children, but whose students were mostly the offspring of fur traders and their Native American “country wives 7.” James Farlinger and Nancy Fraser divorced after 1824, and James Farlinger remarried a Lamorandiere. By the mid-1840s, all four daughters had left Drummond Island to marry and begin their own families.

The Farlinger daughters' choices of spouses and eventual life circumstances crossed political boundaries and cultures. Daughter Marie and husband Charles Wachter, whose family was part of a commercial, fishing enterprise, married on Mackinac Island, Michigan (1845), and remained close to home. Daughters Josephee (Josette) and Nancy followed the paths of other fur-trader families who moved to Canada with the British: Josephee (Josette) married husband Thaddeus Lamorandiere (1837), and Nancy married David McArthur (1838) at Penetanguishene, Ontario, Canada. Daughter Elizabeth married into the Beaulieu fur-trading family, established for generations on the Great Lakes 8; she and husband Clement Hudon married in 1835, in St. Joseph, Michigan, an area that was historically sympathetic to the French 9. Daughters Elizabeth and Nancy died in Minnesota, on the White Earth Reservation, in 1903 and 1879, respectively, with Elizabeth's name appearing opposite a number on an Indian Roll, her origins described as “mixed blood.” Daughter Marie died in 1871 on Mackinac Island; her sister Josephee (Josette), died in 1890, in Saginaw, Michigan.

Fast-forward to the twenty-first century, where in 2006, the late-descendant of Nancy Farling combed the Internet, visiting family genealogy websites with a singular mission: to uncover the origins of her earliest recorded grandmother, Nancy-Anne Fraser, and a hidden family line. Long after her passing, her posts remain published on the Internet, her earlier questions, and replies received, offering a series of clues, that six years later, in 2012, Petoskey, Michigan historian, researcher Richard Wiles, followed, bread-crumb fashion, as he researched the Wachter et. al. family history. The late descendant left an especially significant clue for Richard to find, one that revealed Nancy-Anne Fraser's earliest roots – her haplogroup “A” (Native American) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) test results, which were published on a DNA project website next to the name of her earliest ancestor, “Nancy Fraser.” Of genealogical concern, the published haplogroup “A” mtDNA test results revealed the Native American ancestries of Nancy-Anne Fraser and her maternal-line descendant, now deceased.

After researching the haplogroup A mtDNA test results with Family Tree DNA representatives and the Administrator of the Amerindian Ancestry out of Acadia Project, Richard Wiles determined that to verify Nancy-Anne Fraser's Native American ancestry, he would need to locate another test participant. In search of a second candidate, he compiled the genealogies assessed for the Wachter et. al. family, referenced earlier in the article, tracing maternal-line ancestries from mother to mother, through each of Nancy-Anne Fraser's four daughters, and discovered a second, maternal-line descendant, who agreed to test.

At this point, it is critical to recapitulate the maternal line genealogies of the two candidates: the first candidate, now deceased, descended from Nancy-Anne Fraser through daughter Nancy (Farling), who died on a reservation. The second candidate, discovered through genealogy research, descended from Nancy-Anne Fraser through daughter Marie (Farling), who died on Mackinac Island. For researcher Richard Wiles to verify the accuracy of the compared genealogies, and the Native American ancestry of Nancy-Anne Fraser, the two candidates' mtDNA test results must match!

After several weeks, the second candidate's mtDNA test results were returned: a match had been found between the first and second set of mtDNA test results. The original haplogroup A mtDNA finding received by the first candidate, the late descendant of Nancy (Farling), had resolved to the subgroup “A2i,” as the second candidate, a descendant of Marie (Farling), had completed the full mitochondrial sequence DNA test.

For the Wachter et. al. family, the discovery of a Native American ancestry, twice-verified by matching haplogroup A / A2i mtDNA test results, revealed the family's historic, Native American – fur trader legacy. As a result of Richard Wiles' persistence in locating a second descendant, and pursuing further mtDNA tests, an esteemed, Native American 10, Mackinac Island cultural heritage that had been destroyed by physical isolation, politics, and prejudice has been recovered for the Wachter, Fisher, Fraser, and Farling families.

Richard Wiles invites others who link to this family to email him directly at wiles.ra.t@att.net for further information, comments, and questions and posts the following maternal family lines with the families' permission:

Line 1:

Unknown Ojibwe / Chippewa Woman m. ? Fraser
Nancy-Anne Fraser m. James Farlinger, 1814
Marie Farlinger m. Charles Wachter, 1845, Mackinac Island (Michigan, USA)
Elsie Elizabeth Wachter m. Jeremiah Fisher, 1870, Cheboygan (Michigan, USA)

Line 2:

Unknown Ojibwe / Chippewa Woman m. ? Fraser
Nancy-Anne Fraser m. James Farlinger, 1814
Nancy Farlinger m. David McArthur, 1838, Penetanguishene (Ontario, Canada)
Nancy Jane McArthur m. Thomas Billings Adams ?

For questions about the Amerindian Ancestry out of Acadia Family Tree DNA project, email the Project Administrator at mrundqui@shentel.net. To view project test results, visit http://www.familytreedna.com/public/AcadianAmerIndian/default.aspx?/publicwebsite.aspx
Copyright 2012

__________________________________________________________________________
1. Jennifer S. H. Brown, W. J. Eccles, and Donald P. Heldman, eds. The Fur Trade Revisited: Selected Papers of the Sixth North American Fur Trade Conference, Mackinac Island, Michigan, 1991. East Lansing and Mackinac Island: Michigan State University Press/Mackinac State Historic Parks, 1994. pp. 39-50.
2. Ibid, 311.
3. Ibid., 310.
4. Ibid., 47, 56, n. 54
5. Ibid., 39-50.
6. Ibid., pp. 161-164, 310.
7. Ibid, 319. In Keith R. Widder's Battle for the Soul, Metis Children Encounter Evangelical Protestants at Mackinaw Mission, 1823-1837, the names of Elizabeth Farling (age 10), Nancy Farling (age 7), of Drummond Island, are listed in an appendix as attending in the year 1827. Both were described as "1/4 Chippaway."
8. Ibid., 199.
9. Ibid., pp. 306, 307.
10. Wyckoff, Larry M. 1836 Mixed-Blood Census Register, Ottawas and Chippewas of Michigan, Treaty of March 28, 1836,
includes a record of claimant Elizabeth Farling, listed her status as "admitted" and the amount of awarded monies: "486 Elizabeth Farling 3 19 Mackinac 9 1/4 Chippewa Admitted $95.14 To be retained Does not live with parents." 
FARLING James (I49773)
 
7124 WILES WHITE PAPER PROJECT NO. 5 - “D” Schultz Northern Michigan Family History


Charles Wachter, Jr.
Mackinac Island Fur Trader-Native American Roots Twice Verified by Daughters' DNA
...by Marie Rundquist and Richard Wiles

Mackinac Island on Lake Huron is central to the histories of North America's fur-trading industry in the the 18th and 19th centuries and the Wachter, Fraser, Fisher, and Farlinger (also known as Farling and McFarland) families of northern Michigan. On Mackinac Island, a 3.8 square mile spit of land located at the “tip of the mitten,” mid-way between Michigan's Upper and Lower Peninsulas, the North American fur-trading industry found its nexus, and a culture, comprised of Canadian fur-traders and their Native American wives, had its beginnings.

At the root of this family genealogy and cultural heritage is grandmother “Nancy-Anne Fraser,” whose storied, Scottish surname evokes discussion of John Fraser, a founding partner in Canada's McTavish, Fraser and Co. -- chief suppliers and fur brokers for the legendary North West Company. According to Harry Duckworth, John Fraser had engaged in Canadian business affairs throughout his career, traveling between London and Canada to restore a failed financial position while under the firm of Fraser and Young. John's association with the North American fur-trading industry began in earnest in the early 1790s, when he was at the mid-point of his life, and the McTavish, Fraser and Company was founded 1.

Based in Montreal, Fraser's company engaged in commerce with Mackinac Island fur trading society 2, fostering the inter-dependency of the two regions: with Mackinac Island serving as a supplier of furs and Montreal acting as its agent and vital link to the markets of Europe 3. In addition to his wife, Jeanne McKenzie, and two daughters, Justina and Mary, John Fraser had three sons: James, John (whom he helped place on the board of supervisors of the amalgamation of fur-trading giants, the North West and Hudson Bay Companies), and another who became a priest. According to Duckworth, daughter Mary married an unrelated, “James Fraser of Belladrum 4.” Through his partnership with McTavish, Fraser, and Company, John Fraser had in his later years, re-gained his fortune, established a Fraser family legacy in the North American fur-trading business, and he died in 1825, at the age of eighty-three. 5

In the early 1790s, when the McTavish, Fraser and Company was gaining a foot-hold in the local fur-trading economy, “Nancy-Anne Fraser,” of unknown parentage, was born. According to her husband's military records, Nancy-Anne Fraser was a half-breed, a “Metis,” of Anishinaabe (Ottawa (ODAWA)- Chippewa (Ojibwa)) and European (Scottish) ancestry. The Metis culture on Mackinac Island was born of the Native American “country wives,” and the Canadian fur-traders they never “officially” married, but with whom they had first or second families. This kinship-centered, social structure, an integral component of the fur-traders' economic sphere, survived and thrived on Mackinac Island, despite the political struggles between the United States and Britain in the late 18th century 6.

Family genealogy has, that in 1814, Nancy-Anne Fraser married James Farlinger, a blacksmith born in Ontario; she and her husband began their family on the nearby Drummond Island, following the


James Wachter
settlement patterns of other fur-trading families who sought British protection after the War of 1812. Daughters Marie (born 1824), Josephee (Josette) (1815), Elizabeth (1817) and Nancy (1819), were of an age to have attended a Protestant mission school, established on Mackinac Island, for the purpose of educating Indian children, but whose students were mostly the offspring of fur traders and their Native American “country wives 7.” James Farlinger and Nancy Fraser divorced after 1824, and James Farlinger remarried a Lamorandiere. By the mid-1840s, all four daughters had left Drummond Island to marry and begin their own families.

The Farlinger daughters' choices of spouses and eventual life circumstances crossed political boundaries and cultures. Daughter Marie and husband Charles Wachter, whose family was part of a commercial, fishing enterprise, married on Mackinac Island, Michigan (1845), and remained close to home. Daughters Josephee (Josette) and Nancy followed the paths of other fur-trader families who moved to Canada with the British: Josephee (Josette) married husband Thaddeus Lamorandiere (1837), and Nancy married David McArthur (1838) at Penetanguishene, Ontario, Canada. Daughter Elizabeth married into the Beaulieu fur-trading family, established for generations on the Great Lakes 8; she and husband Clement Hudon married in 1835, in St. Joseph, Michigan, an area that was historically sympathetic to the French 9. Daughters Elizabeth and Nancy died in Minnesota, on the White Earth Reservation, in 1903 and 1879, respectively, with Elizabeth's name appearing opposite a number on an Indian Roll, her origins described as “mixed blood.” Daughter Marie died in 1871 on Mackinac Island; her sister Josephee (Josette), died in 1890, in Saginaw, Michigan.

Fast-forward to the twenty-first century, where in 2006, the late-descendant of Nancy Farling combed the Internet, visiting family genealogy websites with a singular mission: to uncover the origins of her earliest recorded grandmother, Nancy-Anne Fraser, and a hidden family line. Long after her passing, her posts remain published on the Internet, her earlier questions, and replies received, offering a series of clues, that six years later, in 2012, Petoskey, Michigan historian, researcher Richard Wiles, followed, bread-crumb fashion, as he researched the Wachter et. al. family history. The late descendant left an especially significant clue for Richard to find, one that revealed Nancy-Anne Fraser's earliest roots – her haplogroup “A” (Native American) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) test results, which were published on a DNA project website next to the name of her earliest ancestor, “Nancy Fraser.” Of genealogical concern, the published haplogroup “A” mtDNA test results revealed the Native American ancestries of Nancy-Anne Fraser and her maternal-line descendant, now deceased.

After researching the haplogroup A mtDNA test results with Family Tree DNA representatives and the Administrator of the Amerindian Ancestry out of Acadia Project, Richard Wiles determined that to verify Nancy-Anne Fraser's Native American ancestry, he would need to locate another test participant. In search of a second candidate, he compiled the genealogies assessed for the Wachter et. al. family, referenced earlier in the article, tracing maternal-line ancestries from mother to mother, through each of Nancy-Anne Fraser's four daughters, and discovered a second, maternal-line descendant, who agreed to test.

At this point, it is critical to recapitulate the maternal line genealogies of the two candidates: the first candidate, now deceased, descended from Nancy-Anne Fraser through daughter Nancy (Farling), who died on a reservation. The second candidate, discovered through genealogy research, descended from Nancy-Anne Fraser through daughter Marie (Farling), who died on Mackinac Island. For researcher Richard Wiles to verify the accuracy of the compared genealogies, and the Native American ancestry of Nancy-Anne Fraser, the two candidates' mtDNA test results must match!

After several weeks, the second candidate's mtDNA test results were returned: a match had been found between the first and second set of mtDNA test results. The original haplogroup A mtDNA finding received by the first candidate, the late descendant of Nancy (Farling), had resolved to the subgroup “A2i,” as the second candidate, a descendant of Marie (Farling), had completed the full mitochondrial sequence DNA test.

For the Wachter et. al. family, the discovery of a Native American ancestry, twice-verified by matching haplogroup A / A2i mtDNA test results, revealed the family's historic, Native American – fur trader legacy. As a result of Richard Wiles' persistence in locating a second descendant, and pursuing further mtDNA tests, an esteemed, Native American 10, Mackinac Island cultural heritage that had been destroyed by physical isolation, politics, and prejudice has been recovered for the Wachter, Fisher, Fraser, and Farling families.

Richard Wiles invites others who link to this family to email him directly at wiles.ra.t@att.net for further information, comments, and questions and posts the following maternal family lines with the families' permission:

Line 1:

Unknown Ojibwe / Chippewa Woman m. ? Fraser
Nancy-Anne Fraser m. James Farlinger, 1814
Marie Farlinger m. Charles Wachter, 1845, Mackinac Island (Michigan, USA)
Elsie Elizabeth Wachter m. Jeremiah Fisher, 1870, Cheboygan (Michigan, USA)

Line 2:

Unknown Ojibwe / Chippewa Woman m. ? Fraser
Nancy-Anne Fraser m. James Farlinger, 1814
Nancy Farlinger m. David McArthur, 1838, Penetanguishene (Ontario, Canada)
Nancy Jane McArthur m. Thomas Billings Adams ?

For questions about the Amerindian Ancestry out of Acadia Family Tree DNA project, email the Project Administrator at mrundqui@shentel.net. To view project test results, visit http://www.familytreedna.com/public/AcadianAmerIndian/default.aspx?/publicwebsite.aspx
Copyright 2012

__________________________________________________________________________
1. Jennifer S. H. Brown, W. J. Eccles, and Donald P. Heldman, eds. The Fur Trade Revisited: Selected Papers of the Sixth North American Fur Trade Conference, Mackinac Island, Michigan, 1991. East Lansing and Mackinac Island: Michigan State University Press/Mackinac State Historic Parks, 1994. pp. 39-50.
2. Ibid, 311.
3. Ibid., 310.
4. Ibid., 47, 56, n. 54
5. Ibid., 39-50.
6. Ibid., pp. 161-164, 310.
7. Ibid, 319. In Keith R. Widder's Battle for the Soul, Metis Children Encounter Evangelical Protestants at Mackinaw Mission, 1823-1837, the names of Elizabeth Farling (age 10), Nancy Farling (age 7), of Drummond Island, are listed in an appendix as attending in the year 1827. Both were described as "1/4 Chippaway."
8. Ibid., 199.
9. Ibid., pp. 306, 307.
10. Wyckoff, Larry M. 1836 Mixed-Blood Census Register, Ottawas and Chippewas of Michigan, Treaty of March 28, 1836,
includes a record of claimant Elizabeth Farling, listed her status as "admitted" and the amount of awarded monies: "486 Elizabeth Farling 3 19 Mackinac 9 1/4 Chippewa Admitted $95.14 To be retained Does not live with parents."


Subject: NANCY FRASER Ottaw-Chippewa maternal ----mtDNA results are in from Family Tree DNA


Family Tree DNA results concerning Ottawa-Chippewa Maternal Native Bloodline of NANCY/ANN NACY FRASER of Drummond Island + (James Fraser-Scottish fur trader of Mackinac Island) @ 1800


the 9-15-2012 Ginny Morris-Chamberlin mtDNA results
Kit No. 237646
&
the 2005 Georgianne Wakeham mtDNA results

Kit No. 37008

both show:

HAPLOGROUP A subclave A2i
HVR1 Mutations 16111T
16223T 16290T 16319A 16325C
16362T
16519C

Georgianne is 6th generation maternal descendant of NANCY FARLING -daughter of Ann Nancy Fraser and James Farling---------Nancy Ann was product of Scottish fur trader and Native Drummond Island (Mackinac Island-Michigan)woman

Ginny Morris-Chamberlin is 6th generation maternal descendant of MARIE FARLING-daughter of Ann Nancy Fraser and James Farling

Nancy Farling and Marie Farling are sisters!

Richard A.Wiles-petoskey, michigan
wiles.ra.t@att.net 
FRASER Nancy-Anne (I49774)
 
7125 WILES WHITE PAPER PROJECT NO. 5 - “D” Schultz Northern Michigan Family History


Charles Wachter, Jr.
Mackinac Island Fur Trader-Native American Roots Twice Verified by Daughters' DNA
...by Marie Rundquist and Richard Wiles

Mackinac Island on Lake Huron is central to the histories of North America's fur-trading industry in the the 18th and 19th centuries and the Wachter, Fraser, Fisher, and Farlinger (also known as Farling and McFarland) families of northern Michigan. On Mackinac Island, a 3.8 square mile spit of land located at the “tip of the mitten,” mid-way between Michigan's Upper and Lower Peninsulas, the North American fur-trading industry found its nexus, and a culture, comprised of Canadian fur-traders and their Native American wives, had its beginnings.

At the root of this family genealogy and cultural heritage is grandmother “Nancy-Anne Fraser,” whose storied, Scottish surname evokes discussion of John Fraser, a founding partner in Canada's McTavish, Fraser and Co. -- chief suppliers and fur brokers for the legendary North West Company. According to Harry Duckworth, John Fraser had engaged in Canadian business affairs throughout his career, traveling between London and Canada to restore a failed financial position while under the firm of Fraser and Young. John's association with the North American fur-trading industry began in earnest in the early 1790s, when he was at the mid-point of his life, and the McTavish, Fraser and Company was founded 1.

Based in Montreal, Fraser's company engaged in commerce with Mackinac Island fur trading society 2, fostering the inter-dependency of the two regions: with Mackinac Island serving as a supplier of furs and Montreal acting as its agent and vital link to the markets of Europe 3. In addition to his wife, Jeanne McKenzie, and two daughters, Justina and Mary, John Fraser had three sons: James, John (whom he helped place on the board of supervisors of the amalgamation of fur-trading giants, the North West and Hudson Bay Companies), and another who became a priest. According to Duckworth, daughter Mary married an unrelated, “James Fraser of Belladrum 4.” Through his partnership with McTavish, Fraser, and Company, John Fraser had in his later years, re-gained his fortune, established a Fraser family legacy in the North American fur-trading business, and he died in 1825, at the age of eighty-three. 5

In the early 1790s, when the McTavish, Fraser and Company was gaining a foot-hold in the local fur-trading economy, “Nancy-Anne Fraser,” of unknown parentage, was born. According to her husband's military records, Nancy-Anne Fraser was a half-breed, a “Metis,” of Anishinaabe (Ottawa (ODAWA)- Chippewa (Ojibwa)) and European (Scottish) ancestry. The Metis culture on Mackinac Island was born of the Native American “country wives,” and the Canadian fur-traders they never “officially” married, but with whom they had first or second families. This kinship-centered, social structure, an integral component of the fur-traders' economic sphere, survived and thrived on Mackinac Island, despite the political struggles between the United States and Britain in the late 18th century 6.

Family genealogy has, that in 1814, Nancy-Anne Fraser married James Farlinger, a blacksmith born in Ontario; she and her husband began their family on the nearby Drummond Island, following the


James Wachter
settlement patterns of other fur-trading families who sought British protection after the War of 1812. Daughters Marie (born 1824), Josephee (Josette) (1815), Elizabeth (1817) and Nancy (1819), were of an age to have attended a Protestant mission school, established on Mackinac Island, for the purpose of educating Indian children, but whose students were mostly the offspring of fur traders and their Native American “country wives 7.” James Farlinger and Nancy Fraser divorced after 1824, and James Farlinger remarried a Lamorandiere. By the mid-1840s, all four daughters had left Drummond Island to marry and begin their own families.

The Farlinger daughters' choices of spouses and eventual life circumstances crossed political boundaries and cultures. Daughter Marie and husband Charles Wachter, whose family was part of a commercial, fishing enterprise, married on Mackinac Island, Michigan (1845), and remained close to home. Daughters Josephee (Josette) and Nancy followed the paths of other fur-trader families who moved to Canada with the British: Josephee (Josette) married husband Thaddeus Lamorandiere (1837), and Nancy married David McArthur (1838) at Penetanguishene, Ontario, Canada. Daughter Elizabeth married into the Beaulieu fur-trading family, established for generations on the Great Lakes 8; she and husband Clement Hudon married in 1835, in St. Joseph, Michigan, an area that was historically sympathetic to the French 9. Daughters Elizabeth and Nancy died in Minnesota, on the White Earth Reservation, in 1903 and 1879, respectively, with Elizabeth's name appearing opposite a number on an Indian Roll, her origins described as “mixed blood.” Daughter Marie died in 1871 on Mackinac Island; her sister Josephee (Josette), died in 1890, in Saginaw, Michigan.

Fast-forward to the twenty-first century, where in 2006, the late-descendant of Nancy Farling combed the Internet, visiting family genealogy websites with a singular mission: to uncover the origins of her earliest recorded grandmother, Nancy-Anne Fraser, and a hidden family line. Long after her passing, her posts remain published on the Internet, her earlier questions, and replies received, offering a series of clues, that six years later, in 2012, Petoskey, Michigan historian, researcher Richard Wiles, followed, bread-crumb fashion, as he researched the Wachter et. al. family history. The late descendant left an especially significant clue for Richard to find, one that revealed Nancy-Anne Fraser's earliest roots – her haplogroup “A” (Native American) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) test results, which were published on a DNA project website next to the name of her earliest ancestor, “Nancy Fraser.” Of genealogical concern, the published haplogroup “A” mtDNA test results revealed the Native American ancestries of Nancy-Anne Fraser and her maternal-line descendant, now deceased.

After researching the haplogroup A mtDNA test results with Family Tree DNA representatives and the Administrator of the Amerindian Ancestry out of Acadia Project, Richard Wiles determined that to verify Nancy-Anne Fraser's Native American ancestry, he would need to locate another test participant. In search of a second candidate, he compiled the genealogies assessed for the Wachter et. al. family, referenced earlier in the article, tracing maternal-line ancestries from mother to mother, through each of Nancy-Anne Fraser's four daughters, and discovered a second, maternal-line descendant, who agreed to test.

At this point, it is critical to recapitulate the maternal line genealogies of the two candidates: the first candidate, now deceased, descended from Nancy-Anne Fraser through daughter Nancy (Farling), who died on a reservation. The second candidate, discovered through genealogy research, descended from Nancy-Anne Fraser through daughter Marie (Farling), who died on Mackinac Island. For researcher Richard Wiles to verify the accuracy of the compared genealogies, and the Native American ancestry of Nancy-Anne Fraser, the two candidates' mtDNA test results must match!

After several weeks, the second candidate's mtDNA test results were returned: a match had been found between the first and second set of mtDNA test results. The original haplogroup A mtDNA finding received by the first candidate, the late descendant of Nancy (Farling), had resolved to the subgroup “A2i,” as the second candidate, a descendant of Marie (Farling), had completed the full mitochondrial sequence DNA test.

For the Wachter et. al. family, the discovery of a Native American ancestry, twice-verified by matching haplogroup A / A2i mtDNA test results, revealed the family's historic, Native American – fur trader legacy. As a result of Richard Wiles' persistence in locating a second descendant, and pursuing further mtDNA tests, an esteemed, Native American 10, Mackinac Island cultural heritage that had been destroyed by physical isolation, politics, and prejudice has been recovered for the Wachter, Fisher, Fraser, and Farling families.

Richard Wiles invites others who link to this family to email him directly at wiles.ra.t@att.net for further information, comments, and questions and posts the following maternal family lines with the families' permission:

Line 1:

Unknown Ojibwe / Chippewa Woman m. ? Fraser
Nancy-Anne Fraser m. James Farlinger, 1814
Marie Farlinger m. Charles Wachter, 1845, Mackinac Island (Michigan, USA)
Elsie Elizabeth Wachter m. Jeremiah Fisher, 1870, Cheboygan (Michigan, USA)

Line 2:

Unknown Ojibwe / Chippewa Woman m. ? Fraser
Nancy-Anne Fraser m. James Farlinger, 1814
Nancy Farlinger m. David McArthur, 1838, Penetanguishene (Ontario, Canada)
Nancy Jane McArthur m. Thomas Billings Adams ?

For questions about the Amerindian Ancestry out of Acadia Family Tree DNA project, email the Project Administrator at mrundqui@shentel.net. To view project test results, visit http://www.familytreedna.com/public/AcadianAmerIndian/default.aspx?/publicwebsite.aspx
Copyright 2012

__________________________________________________________________________
1. Jennifer S. H. Brown, W. J. Eccles, and Donald P. Heldman, eds. The Fur Trade Revisited: Selected Papers of the Sixth North American Fur Trade Conference, Mackinac Island, Michigan, 1991. East Lansing and Mackinac Island: Michigan State University Press/Mackinac State Historic Parks, 1994. pp. 39-50.
2. Ibid, 311.
3. Ibid., 310.
4. Ibid., 47, 56, n. 54
5. Ibid., 39-50.
6. Ibid., pp. 161-164, 310.
7. Ibid, 319. In Keith R. Widder's Battle for the Soul, Metis Children Encounter Evangelical Protestants at Mackinaw Mission, 1823-1837, the names of Elizabeth Farling (age 10), Nancy Farling (age 7), of Drummond Island, are listed in an appendix as attending in the year 1827. Both were described as "1/4 Chippaway."
8. Ibid., 199.
9. Ibid., pp. 306, 307.
10. Wyckoff, Larry M. 1836 Mixed-Blood Census Register, Ottawas and Chippewas of Michigan, Treaty of March 28, 1836,
includes a record of claimant Elizabeth Farling, listed her status as "admitted" and the amount of awarded monies: "486 Elizabeth Farling 3 19 Mackinac 9 1/4 Chippewa Admitted $95.14 To be retained Does not live with parents." 
WACHTER Charles (I54655)
 
7126 WILES WHITE PAPER PROJECT NO. 5 - “D” Schultz Northern Michigan Family History


Charles Wachter, Jr.
Mackinac Island Fur Trader-Native American Roots Twice Verified by Daughters' DNA
...by Marie Rundquist and Richard Wiles

Mackinac Island on Lake Huron is central to the histories of North America's fur-trading industry in the the 18th and 19th centuries and the Wachter, Fraser, Fisher, and Farlinger (also known as Farling and McFarland) families of northern Michigan. On Mackinac Island, a 3.8 square mile spit of land located at the “tip of the mitten,” mid-way between Michigan's Upper and Lower Peninsulas, the North American fur-trading industry found its nexus, and a culture, comprised of Canadian fur-traders and their Native American wives, had its beginnings.

At the root of this family genealogy and cultural heritage is grandmother “Nancy-Anne Fraser,” whose storied, Scottish surname evokes discussion of John Fraser, a founding partner in Canada's McTavish, Fraser and Co. -- chief suppliers and fur brokers for the legendary North West Company. According to Harry Duckworth, John Fraser had engaged in Canadian business affairs throughout his career, traveling between London and Canada to restore a failed financial position while under the firm of Fraser and Young. John's association with the North American fur-trading industry began in earnest in the early 1790s, when he was at the mid-point of his life, and the McTavish, Fraser and Company was founded 1.

Based in Montreal, Fraser's company engaged in commerce with Mackinac Island fur trading society 2, fostering the inter-dependency of the two regions: with Mackinac Island serving as a supplier of furs and Montreal acting as its agent and vital link to the markets of Europe 3. In addition to his wife, Jeanne McKenzie, and two daughters, Justina and Mary, John Fraser had three sons: James, John (whom he helped place on the board of supervisors of the amalgamation of fur-trading giants, the North West and Hudson Bay Companies), and another who became a priest. According to Duckworth, daughter Mary married an unrelated, “James Fraser of Belladrum 4.” Through his partnership with McTavish, Fraser, and Company, John Fraser had in his later years, re-gained his fortune, established a Fraser family legacy in the North American fur-trading business, and he died in 1825, at the age of eighty-three. 5

In the early 1790s, when the McTavish, Fraser and Company was gaining a foot-hold in the local fur-trading economy, “Nancy-Anne Fraser,” of unknown parentage, was born. According to her husband's military records, Nancy-Anne Fraser was a half-breed, a “Metis,” of Anishinaabe (Ottawa (ODAWA)- Chippewa (Ojibwa)) and European (Scottish) ancestry. The Metis culture on Mackinac Island was born of the Native American “country wives,” and the Canadian fur-traders they never “officially” married, but with whom they had first or second families. This kinship-centered, social structure, an integral component of the fur-traders' economic sphere, survived and thrived on Mackinac Island, despite the political struggles between the United States and Britain in the late 18th century 6.

Family genealogy has, that in 1814, Nancy-Anne Fraser married James Farlinger, a blacksmith born in Ontario; she and her husband began their family on the nearby Drummond Island, following the


James Wachter
settlement patterns of other fur-trading families who sought British protection after the War of 1812. Daughters Marie (born 1824), Josephee (Josette) (1815), Elizabeth (1817) and Nancy (1819), were of an age to have attended a Protestant mission school, established on Mackinac Island, for the purpose of educating Indian children, but whose students were mostly the offspring of fur traders and their Native American “country wives 7.” James Farlinger and Nancy Fraser divorced after 1824, and James Farlinger remarried a Lamorandiere. By the mid-1840s, all four daughters had left Drummond Island to marry and begin their own families.

The Farlinger daughters' choices of spouses and eventual life circumstances crossed political boundaries and cultures. Daughter Marie and husband Charles Wachter, whose family was part of a commercial, fishing enterprise, married on Mackinac Island, Michigan (1845), and remained close to home. Daughters Josephee (Josette) and Nancy followed the paths of other fur-trader families who moved to Canada with the British: Josephee (Josette) married husband Thaddeus Lamorandiere (1837), and Nancy married David McArthur (1838) at Penetanguishene, Ontario, Canada. Daughter Elizabeth married into the Beaulieu fur-trading family, established for generations on the Great Lakes 8; she and husband Clement Hudon married in 1835, in St. Joseph, Michigan, an area that was historically sympathetic to the French 9. Daughters Elizabeth and Nancy died in Minnesota, on the White Earth Reservation, in 1903 and 1879, respectively, with Elizabeth's name appearing opposite a number on an Indian Roll, her origins described as “mixed blood.” Daughter Marie died in 1871 on Mackinac Island; her sister Josephee (Josette), died in 1890, in Saginaw, Michigan.

Fast-forward to the twenty-first century, where in 2006, the late-descendant of Nancy Farling combed the Internet, visiting family genealogy websites with a singular mission: to uncover the origins of her earliest recorded grandmother, Nancy-Anne Fraser, and a hidden family line. Long after her passing, her posts remain published on the Internet, her earlier questions, and replies received, offering a series of clues, that six years later, in 2012, Petoskey, Michigan historian, researcher Richard Wiles, followed, bread-crumb fashion, as he researched the Wachter et. al. family history. The late descendant left an especially significant clue for Richard to find, one that revealed Nancy-Anne Fraser's earliest roots – her haplogroup “A” (Native American) mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) test results, which were published on a DNA project website next to the name of her earliest ancestor, “Nancy Fraser.” Of genealogical concern, the published haplogroup “A” mtDNA test results revealed the Native American ancestries of Nancy-Anne Fraser and her maternal-line descendant, now deceased.

After researching the haplogroup A mtDNA test results with Family Tree DNA representatives and the Administrator of the Amerindian Ancestry out of Acadia Project, Richard Wiles determined that to verify Nancy-Anne Fraser's Native American ancestry, he would need to locate another test participant. In search of a second candidate, he compiled the genealogies assessed for the Wachter et. al. family, referenced earlier in the article, tracing maternal-line ancestries from mother to mother, through each of Nancy-Anne Fraser's four daughters, and discovered a second, maternal-line descendant, who agreed to test.

At this point, it is critical to recapitulate the maternal line genealogies of the two candidates: the first candidate, now deceased, descended from Nancy-Anne Fraser through daughter Nancy (Farling), who died on a reservation. The second candidate, discovered through genealogy research, descended from Nancy-Anne Fraser through daughter Marie (Farling), who died on Mackinac Island. For researcher Richard Wiles to verify the accuracy of the compared genealogies, and the Native American ancestry of Nancy-Anne Fraser, the two candidates' mtDNA test results must match!

After several weeks, the second candidate's mtDNA test results were returned: a match had been found between the first and second set of mtDNA test results. The original haplogroup A mtDNA finding received by the first candidate, the late descendant of Nancy (Farling), had resolved to the subgroup “A2i,” as the second candidate, a descendant of Marie (Farling), had completed the full mitochondrial sequence DNA test.

For the Wachter et. al. family, the discovery of a Native American ancestry, twice-verified by matching haplogroup A / A2i mtDNA test results, revealed the family's historic, Native American – fur trader legacy. As a result of Richard Wiles' persistence in locating a second descendant, and pursuing further mtDNA tests, an esteemed, Native American 10, Mackinac Island cultural heritage that had been destroyed by physical isolation, politics, and prejudice has been recovered for the Wachter, Fisher, Fraser, and Farling families.

Richard Wiles invites others who link to this family to email him directly at wiles.ra.t@att.net for further information, comments, and questions and posts the following maternal family lines with the families' permission:

Line 1:

Unknown Ojibwe / Chippewa Woman m. ? Fraser
Nancy-Anne Fraser m. James Farlinger, 1814
Marie Farlinger m. Charles Wachter, 1845, Mackinac Island (Michigan, USA)
Elsie Elizabeth Wachter m. Jeremiah Fisher, 1870, Cheboygan (Michigan, USA)

Line 2:

Unknown Ojibwe / Chippewa Woman m. ? Fraser
Nancy-Anne Fraser m. James Farlinger, 1814
Nancy Farlinger m. David McArthur, 1838, Penetanguishene (Ontario, Canada)
Nancy Jane McArthur m. Thomas Billings Adams ?

For questions about the Amerindian Ancestry out of Acadia Family Tree DNA project, email the Project Administrator at mrundqui@shentel.net. To view project test results, visit http://www.familytreedna.com/public/AcadianAmerIndian/default.aspx?/publicwebsite.aspx
Copyright 2012

__________________________________________________________________________
1. Jennifer S. H. Brown, W. J. Eccles, and Donald P. Heldman, eds. The Fur Trade Revisited: Selected Papers of the Sixth North American Fur Trade Conference, Mackinac Island, Michigan, 1991. East Lansing and Mackinac Island: Michigan State University Press/Mackinac State Historic Parks, 1994. pp. 39-50.
2. Ibid, 311.
3. Ibid., 310.
4. Ibid., 47, 56, n. 54
5. Ibid., 39-50.
6. Ibid., pp. 161-164, 310.
7. Ibid, 319. In Keith R. Widder's Battle for the Soul, Metis Children Encounter Evangelical Protestants at Mackinaw Mission, 1823-1837, the names of Elizabeth Farling (age 10), Nancy Farling (age 7), of Drummond Island, are listed in an appendix as attending in the year 1827. Both were described as "1/4 Chippaway."
8. Ibid., 199.
9. Ibid., pp. 306, 307.
10. Wyckoff, Larry M. 1836 Mixed-Blood Census Register, Ottawas and Chippewas of Michigan, Treaty of March 28, 1836,
includes a record of claimant Elizabeth Farling, listed her status as "admitted" and the amount of awarded monies: "486 Elizabeth Farling 3 19 Mackinac 9 1/4 Chippewa Admitted $95.14 To be retained Does not live with parents." 
Wachter James (I54666)
 
7127 Will dated 14 Jul. 1660 SMITH Daniel (I8902)
 
7128 Will of Anthony Newland of Taunton, Bristol Co., MA, "being very sick", dated 12 May 1712, probated 7 July 1712, Wife, Hester. Mentions "Children, yet of minority," but does not name them, Witns: John Austin, Joseph Grey and Simeon Wetherell. [3:131]


Inventory of Estate of Anthony Newland of Taunton, dated 19 June, 1712 Presented by his widow and Executrix, Hester Newland. Apprs: Benjamin Leonard, Benjamin Leanard, jr. and John Austin. [3:130] 
Austin Hesther (I52432)
 
7129 WILL OF SAMUEL ANNABLE TO HIS SONNE THOMAS


On May, 1727, "Samuel Annable of Barnstable...yoeman For and in Consideration of ye Love good will and parental affection which I have and bear unto my Loving son Thomas Annable of sd Barnstable, Do herby Give...unto him my sd son...that percell of upland Scituate in Barnstable aforsd To ye Southward of my Dwelling house Containing Six acres more or Less bounded Easterly by ye Cart way that Leads up into ye woods between my sd House and ye House of Geddean Hadway Southwardly by Mr. John Lathrops wood Lot Westerly and Nothery by the Lands of Mr James Pain...Reserving to my Selfe Liberty to Cut wood of from sd Land During my natural Life".

The deed was signed "Samuel Annable". The witnesses were "Silvanus Bourn" and "methitable dimouck". It was acknowledged, 5 May, 1727, before John Bacon, Justice of the Peace and recorded, 18 June, 1728, in Barnstable County Deeds,[14:168], by John Thacher, Register. It has not been rerecorded, since the fire.

It is endorsed on the back "Mr. Saml Annable to Thomas Annable". 
Annable Samuel (I53486)
 
7130 will probated at Boston Mar, 25, 1672 PRATT Mathew (I6678)
 
7131 William and his wife, Olivia Williams, were married in Utica, New by Rev. P. A. Proal, D. D. Anable William Stewart (I53670)
 
7132 William came to Waterford after the Revolutionary War as a young man, and with his brother, Thaddeus, took up land and cleared a farm. He married Betsy Wheeler and had a family of eight children. In later life, he ran an inn at Waterford, on Lake Keoka.

He and his wife, Betsy are buried in the South Waterford Cemetery. 
Brown William (I50674)
 
7133 William de Beauchamp (d.1170) of Salwarpe and Elmley allegedly married Bertha dau. of William de Braose (d.1211). The latter's great grandson, William de Braose (d.1230) of Abergavenny had a dau. & coheir Maud (d.1301) who married Roger de Mortimer (d.1282) of Wigmore. Saunders gives no marriage of a Bertha de Braose (or of a Maud de B) to William de Beauchamp. Turton does give the marriage of Bertha and William based on information from the first edition (1910) of Cokayne's *Complete Peerage*. As far as I can tell the second edition omits any reference to the early Beauchamps. B Burke's *Dormant, Abeyant, Forfeited and Extinct Peerages of the British Empire* (London, 1883) p.29 has William Beachamp marrying a Maud de Braose. Since (1) Burke is to be treated with extreme caution, (2)it seems that the editors of the second edition of *The Complete Peerage* deleted material on the early Beauchamps and (3) Saunders notes marriages between the baronial families dealt with but omits this marriage, the upshot would seem to be that there is no hard evidence of a Braose marriage to William Beauchamp (d.1170).

I J Saunders *English Baronies: a study of their origin and descent 1086-1327* (London, 1963 1960), pp.7,21,75-76.

W H Turton *The Plantagenet Ancestry* (London, 1928), p.117. 
De BEAUCHAMP William (I22938)
 
7134 William Duckrell my 2x great grandfather was a bigamist as he already had a wife in England when he "married" Elvina. He took his middle name after arriving in USA as he was not baptised with it. He married Esther Greville in 1843 at Christchurch CE Spitalfields, now in London. They had six children. One died but when he went to USA his children were put in a workhouse and his wife went in service as a child nurse. Before going to USA he had a goldsmith shop in Bath, Somerset and lived in an affluent area of Bath. He was born in Hackney(now part of London) and lived his early years in the east end of London. He had three sisters all of which emigrated to Australia along with his mother after his father, Robert, died in 1833.

Grahame Nicholis

Service Info.: Private, 40th Mass. Infantry, Sept. 10, 1862. Second Lieutenant, 61st Mass. Infantry, Dec. 5, 1864. Mustered out, July 16, 1865. Died at Alexandria, Va., July 29, 1894.

Was at the Battle of Bull Run, 7/21/1861 
DUCKRELL William Jones (I37999)
 
7135 William F. Wright appeared on the census of 1850 at Milford, Worcester, Massachusetts.4 He appeared on the census of 1860 at Smithfield, Providence, Rhode Island.1 He appeared on the census of 1870 at Smithfield, Providence, Rhode Island.5 He appeared on the census of 1880 at Lincoln, Providence, Rhode Island.6 He appeared on the census of 1900 at Cumberland, Providence, Rhode Island, as the father-in-law of the head of the household, Louis I. Stevens.2 WRIGHT William F. (I39937)
 
7136 William Goldsmith Brown was born on March 3, 1812 in Whitingham, Vermont. William Goldsmith was the second son of Nathan Brown sr. and Betsey Goldsmith Brown. William’s brother Nathan jr., as mentioned earlier, was 5 years older. There were also, 2 daughters, Sophia and Nancy, of which I find only brief mention.

William Goldsmith and his older brother Nathan, shared a passion for education, both attending William College. Nathan graduated Valedictorian in 1827 at the age of 20. In 1833 William Goldsmith entered Williams College but was forced to leave at the end of his junior year because of poor health. William had received a serious hip injury from a fall from a horse drawn wagon when in his teens, an injury from which he never fully recovered. All of his life he walked with a limp and often used a cane. His name was later placed on the alumni roll at Williams College.

Nathan married Eliza Ballard, sister of a classmate at Williams College. William Goldsmith married Eunice Fisher of Halifax, Vermont, a nearby town. William and Eunice had 5 children; Anna Judson, Addison, Mary E. Fred C. and Francis Fisher. Eunice Fisher Brown died in Wisconsin sometime before 1868.

William Goldsmith received his early schooling in New Hampton, NH and at the Bennington, Vt. seminary where his brother Nathan was a teacher. In spite of his injury, William became a teacher and at various times taught school in Bennington, Whitingham, Holyoke and Shelburne Falls.

William Goldsmith took up the challenge of a newspaper editor and publisher in 1840 as editor of the Vermont Telegraph, then later, The Voice of Freedom, both papers were published in Brandon, Vt. and still later, the Chicopee Journal, in Chicopee, MA. When William Goldsmith left Brandon, Vermont, he turned the publishing of the Voice of Freedom paper over to his brother, Nathan.

While in college Nathan had written a poem that he attempted to have published, he was just nineteen years old. The poem entitled “The Missionary’s Call” was offered to a number of publishers without success. No one was interested in publishing his work at that time, but he was heard to say, that if ever his poem was published, it would be his sign from God for him to enter the mission field. When Nathan took over the job as publisher of the Brandon newspaper from his brother, he published his own poem! His message from God heeded, he began to prepare for the mission field.

In 1832 Nathan resigned his position with the Telegraph and enrolled in Newton Seminary (presently Andover Newton) to study for the ministry. In December of that same year Nathan and his wife embarked for Burma as a missionary for the Baptist church. For two years he was stationed at Maulmain, Burma. Nathan learned the Burmese language and then was transferred to a station 800 miles from Calcutta into the country of Assam. He then had the challenge of learning yet another language. In 1855, after twenty-two years of toil and suffering in Assam, India the Browns returned to America. Two of their children died while in India. Much of his story is told in the book, The Whole World Kin, edited and compiled by Nathan’s wife, Mrs.E.W.Brown.

Seventeen years later, after recovering his health and after working as editor of a publication for the Baptist church, in America, he completed his life’s work in Japan.

In 1873 he left his home in Claremont, New Hampshire for Yokohama, Japan. Learning yet another language. He died in Yokohama in 1886 at the age of 79. One of the projects he is remembered for is the translation of the Bible into Vernacular Japanese. A copy of that Bible is in the archives at Harvard Theological College library.

There is enough material on record to write a whole book just on the life of Nathan Brown. I do not thing I will attempt it. I will say this though; Nathan left a long list of accomplishments in America, India and Japan. He was known as a linguist and found languages easy to comprehend and translate.

In 1856 William Goldsmith moved his family to Springfield, Mass. where he lived while editor and publisher of the Chicopee Journal. His son Francis Fisher attended high school there in Chicopee. Shortly before the Civil war William Goldsmith went west, eventually locating in Farmington, Wisconsin. His daughter, Anna Judson joined him there in 1865 when she was twenty-five years of age.
_______

In the U.S. Census of 1870, William Goldsmith Brown, Eunice Brown, Anna J. Preston and Frank Preston all lived in Farmington.
Later moving to a farm in Linwood, Wisconsin, which was near his shingle mill on Mill Creek.

William Goldsmith Brown had a talent for writing, especially poetry. Over the years he acquired a name for himself as an author and editor and eventually was honored by being declared Poet Laureate of Portage County, Wisconsin.

A selection of Brown’s poetry follows this chapter.

Their son Francis Fisher Brown, carried on the tradition of writer and author. During his lifetime he made a name for himself with the Dial Magazine in Chicago. One of Francis fisher’s best known works, “The Everyday life of Abraham Lincoln” has been reprinted and declared to be one of the best accounts of the life of Abraham Lincoln ever written.

Francis Fisher Brown was is business in Chicago and one year before the famous Chicago fire, he lost his printing business to fire. His friend Frank Lloyd Wright, designed his new reading room and publishing house there in Chicago.

*Just a note: Francis Fisher Brown was of frail health from a sickness suffered during the Civil War of which he never fully recovered his physical strength. He operated his publishing business in Chicago and raised his family in Pasadena, California. A close friend and fellow writer in California was John Muir the naturalist.

William Goldsmith’s brother Nathan had a heart for God. In his boyhood he established his role as a missionary.

The following is a quote from the book the Whole World Kin as compiled by Nathan’s wife, many years later.

“One day some seventy-five years ago a little lad came out of the doorway of a low, unpainted farm-house in Vermont, with a sorrowful, yet determined expression on his face. He trudged along the country road for a considerable distance; his countenance growing more troubled as he proceeded, till at length overcome, apparently by fear or distress, he turned and ran home, the tears coursing down his cheeks. After being comforted and encouraged by his mother, he started out again, but was overcome and turned back as before. He had evidently undertaken some difficult or unpleasant business, but it was not given up; again he set out, furnished now with a trifling commission from his mother, to open the way for his own more serious errand. On he marched with more heart to the house of a rather remote neighbor. It was Mr.---, an isolated, rough-mannered man, of whom the country people reported strange things; that he believed in no life apart from this green earth; that he had been heard to say that he should come back as one of the birds, squirrels or cattle when done with this body; and worse than all, that the Bible was not true, and that there was no God! Filled with concern by these reports, the little boy had for some days been thinking the matter over; had become oppressed I with a sense of responsibility, and determined to visit the atheist. His mother had noticed his seriousness, discovered his plan and fearing that he might encounter harshness and profanity, had tried to dissuade him from going, till, finding that the idea was a fixed conscientious purpose, she had at length consented, and the child has set out on his errand. At last the two mile walk along the hilly road was accomplished; the house was reached, and the mother’s message delivered. The real object of the visit was then discovered by the question. “Mr.---do you believe the Bible?” “No; no more than I believe in the dog’s barking.” Not daunted by this blunt negative, the little missionary commenced trying to convince the unbeliever that there is a God. “Who the h*$#&*---sent you here to tell me that?” was the angry retort.

“Nobody sent me,” returned the boy, “but I came to tell you THERE IS A GOD.” He said it as he would have told a blind man there is a sun; and then turned homeward, his mission accomplished, his mind at rest.

Transcript of a letter from Alice Mable Preston Eggelston believed to be written in 1965. As a child of 12, Alice talked to her grandfather, William Goldsmith Brown, hearing many stories, words of wisdom and more. She was able to capture the following bits of family history.

“The Ancestors of this Brown family came to America from England to join his brother Peter Brown of the Mayflower colony in 1600 **see note. Joshua Brown was born in the 1700’s and he and his brothers served in the Revolutionary War. A record of all these facts is written in the book the Whole World Kin.


Written by William Goldsmith Preston 
BROWN William Goldsmith (I55610)
 
7137 William Henry Harrison, a farmer, was named after his uncle, Willaim Henry Harrison Brown but went by the name of" Henry" as recorded in letters to him from his father, Charles, written between 1868-1880 from Cameron, Steuben County, NY.

Henry followed his Aunt Letty (Lettice Loghry Brown) and Uncle Dar (Erasmus Darwin Brown) and other friends of the family to St. Anne and Momence, Kankakee County, Illinois. After Henry married Hannahretta Sicklar Swan, they lived on a farm near Waldron, IL until 1899 when they moved to Fowler, Indiana.

William joined the Union army on March 29, 1864 and was mustered in April 30, 1864. Henry was with the 15th Regiment of Illinois Infantry, as a private. He was sent to Lawton, Millen County Georgia on November 11, 1864. Exchanged April 1865; mustered out May 30, 1865, at Springfield, IL. He was captured at Altoona on Oct 5, 1864, Georgia while guarding a railroad in the rear of Sherman's army and was held for seven months in the terrible Andersonville Prison.

During his internment, with Henry Wirz, Superintendant of the prison, he lived on the ration of a quarter of a pound of fat meat and a half-pint of meal a day.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
The following is a copy of Mr. Loghry's discharge from the army:

"To all whom it may concern:
Know ye that William H. Loghry, a Private of Captain John W. Luke Company "E" 15th Regiment of Illinois Infantry Volunteers who was enrolled on the 29th day of March one thousand eight hundred and 64 to serve three years or during the war is hereby Discharged from the service of the United States this 30th day of May, 1865 at Springfield, Illinois by reason of Telegram from War Dept. dated May 12th, 1865. (No objection to his being re-enlisted is known to exist.)

Said William H. Loghry, born in the State of New York, is 30 years of age, 5 feet 10 inches tall, light complexion, blue eyes, light hair and occupation when enrolled, a farmer.

Given at Springfield, Ills. this Third day of July, 1865.

James S. Hall
Captain 1st W. S. Cav
M. and D. Officer.
() This sentence will be erased
should there be anything in the
conduct or physical condition of
the soldier rendering him unfit
for the Army.
(Written across the discharge)
"Paid in full $42/4.80 by Chas. C. Jones, PMUSA, Dec. 22, 1865
Paid three mos. extra pay and travelling allowances from Springfield, Ills. O. D. Bedington, PM USA"

------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Death took Elizabeth away during Henry's absence, leaving their three small children homeless. After Elizabeth's death, Henry married widow, Hannahretta Sicklar Swan. They lived on a farm near Waldron, Illinois until 1899, when they moved to Fowler, Indiana. Henry was an enthusiastic G. A. R. (S.A.R.?) and his wife was an active member of the W. R. C. Both were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Mr. Loghry was a great reader, very interested in politics. He was a Democrat until McKinley ran for President and then he changed to the Republican Party. In his latter days he was hard of hearing and paralytic
strokes.

Mr. Loghry was an enthusiastic G. A. R. and Mrs. Loghry was an active member of the W. R. C. Both were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Mrs.Hannahretta Loghry died of pnuemonia on Feb. 29, 1908, in Fowler, Indiana and afterwards Mr. Loghry moved to Momence, Kankakee County, IL where his lived with his daughter, Mrs. Mary Loghry DuFrain until his death of bronchial pnuemonia on December 26, 1911. Both Mr. and Mrs. Loghry are buried in the family plot in Aroma Park Cemetery, Waldron, Kankakee County, IL.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------


Letters written by Charles Loghry to his son, William Henry Harrison Loghry

Alens Station, N. Y. August 30,68

Well henry it has bin some time sinse I have rote to you.
We had A leter from you A short time a goe and was glad to hear that you and your family was well and was doing well.
We are as usual working and tuging through this world and triing to git something to live on when we Cant work any more. We have had it very dry this sumer. Spring crops is very poor this year hear and as been as I can hear. Corn aint more than half a crop.
When you git this you must tell us how times is with you. We had A good crop of hay and winter wheat but Barley and oats was lite this year potatoes is A lite crop I have a good croop of buckwheat.
I am going to rite to franklin Loghry*. I begin to think that he has forgotten us it has ben A long time sinse he has rote to us. tell him to rite and let us noe what he is doing.
We have had the hotest weather that was ever none in this country. it was so hot it was all most imposibel to work.
I have sowed one peis of wheat and am redy to sow five acors more this week. I have had the falow ready two weeks.
We are well to day and nobody but us two hear. Ada* is to sunday school while I am riting.
You must come and make us a visit as soon as you can. You must rite as soon as you git this and let us noe how you git along.
You must doe what you can for Seymour and Blain the Democrats will carie this state by A big majority as was ever nown.
Give my respects to unkel Dar* and Lety* and all their fokes.
Good by for this time
to Henry Loghry and wife (signed

Charles Loghry


*1. Franklin Loghry is his son.
2. Ada was a girl they had taken in to raise.
3. Unkel Dar is Erasmus Darwin Brown, brother of Juliette Brown Loghry, and brother-in-law to Charles.
4. Lety is Lettice Loghry Brown, a sister; one of the three Loghry Children to marry three Brown children.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

Cameron, N.Y. Dec 26, 1869

Well Henry it is some time sinse I have rote to you. I thout this morning I woud rite to you and let you noe that we are in the land of the living and as well as usual. I have in qite lame this fall and winter I have got A bad nee that is very lame and pains me very bad so that I cant sleep good nites. it was taken lame last summer and is giting worse. I have got most discourage of its ever giting any beter I haint ploud any this fall help is hard to git and wages is high hear.
Comon labor is one dollar A day and bord and wheat is worth $1.00 for that is good
You rote that you wanted me to send you some money that is out of the question this winter for money is hard to git and very scarce there is nothing that will fetch money hear.
we have had some cold wether and good slaying But this warm today and raining there aint mutch going on this winter hear Sam Brown* has got home from the Asilum and seams to bee all rite he Chops wood evry day Brown's foxes* is well and doing well they are in the hoop pole business this winter
Henry you must keep good Courage your young yet and you mustent git the horers for that dont doe any good if I was of your age and had my health I could live any where I think that I can doe as much as I ever could But when I goe to work I soon git tierd and soon think difernt I have worked this fall that when I got in the house and sot down I had all that I could doe to git up I have the rheumatism most all the time
My nee pains me so that I can hardley rite while I am now riting
We got a leter from your wife on Chrismuss for A Chrismuss present and was glad to hear that you was well and all the friends
I wish that you was hear today to hellp us eat some Big Aples we have the Bigest Aples that you ever seen David Williamson was hear last sunday and he meshered one that was 14 inches round we have got 20 bushels of grafted aples in the seler
Good By for this time rite soon as you git this
We like to hear from you often as we can
Direct to Alens Station
(signed)
C. Loghry
* 1. folks
2. Sam Brown is Samuel Right Brown, Jr.; a brother of Charles's first wife, Juliett Brown Loghry.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------


Cameron, March 15, 1880

Well Henry Loghry it has bin A long time since we have heard from you you dont rite very often and today I thaut that I woud rite you a few lines to let you noe that we are in the land of the living but not very smart this winter I have bin qite poorley this winter and lame not abel to doe my chores nor to cut my wood I am giting old and will soon be out of this world and it wont mater how qick if I am prepard for that day that day will surly come prepared or not Ada and her man is with us this winter and will stay with us this year or that is the talk now if nothing hapens. We have had A very warm winter and noe snow it has bin rather unheathy this winter. A grate many old fokes has dropt off this winter some without one moments warning there are several that has dropt dead seting their chair and it stands us in hand to be ready to meet to meet it if we never meet on this earth less try to meet in heaven your unkel Em Brown* is very poorley this winter he lais A bed the most of the time he haint bin from home in nine years he is nothing but skin and bones.
the rest of the family is well but hard up this winter they had their barn burnd and all their hay and grain and it is touf for them this winter I hurd form you unkel Henry Brown* the other day he is bad off he dont noe hardly any thing and the man told me that they had lost ther property he thout it was all used up they sold out but dident saave mutch
that is bad to loes his senses and property to
times is beter this spring that it has bin for sevel years past money is plenty and proptery is chang hands and things looks beter now than they have for some time
Wheat is 140 rie 90 corn 65 oats 50 potatoes 40 Apels from 50 to 65
hay is from $10 to $12 tone
give my best Respects to all the frends and tell them that I would (like) to see them very much I would like to see you and your wife today and have you hear
tell Juliaette* to rite to us I will rite to her before long now Henry rite soon as you git this and till us how you are giting A long

from your father
(signed)
Charles Loghry

* 1. unkel Henry Brown is William Henry Harrison Brown, brother to Juliette, Charles first wife.
2. Juliaette is Charles'granddaughter by William Henry Harrison Loghry and Elizabeth Williams.
3. Charles Loghry died two years later on 13 Aug. 1882.



The following is from a letter written by Phil Loghry, gg-grandson of William H. H. Loghry:

By the way, he generally preferred to use his second name, Henry. Henry enlisted in the Union Army on March 29, 1864. He was later captured by the Confederate Army, and held for seven months in the Andersonville Prison. He was ultimately released on a prisoner exchange agreement, April 1, 1865, and was honorably discharged on May 30, 1865. During his time in prison, his wife, Elizabeth took ill and died, leaving their children (Charles, JULIA, and Freddie) homeless. By the way, Freddie was a girl...notice the female spelling of the name; also Charles' obit states his brother (Frank), and two sisters (JULIA and Freddie) preceded him in death. Ok, back to the homeless children; I can only assume that brother Frank and wife Elizabeth Sicklar Loghry took the children into their home and cared for them until after their father was discharged from the Army, since both families at that time lived in St. Anne, ILL. (Real estate records show Frank as owning a home in St. Anne during this period. Henry is not listed of owning property there.) Some of this is only speculation on my part, but it could answer the confusion about who JULIA's parents were...I have no doubt that Wm. Henry, and Elizabeth Williams Loghry were her parents, but (speculation) Uncle Frank and Aunt Elizabeth Sicklar Loghry took her & siblings in for quite a long time, since father Henry needed to re-establish a home after the war. On Oct 16, 1866, William Henry married again, to Mrs. Henrietta Swan, a soldier's widow. There were nine children from this union. Children living to mourn his death, Sept. 6, 1911...Charles Franklin Loghry (my Great Grandfather) Julia E. SWAN of Fowler, Indiana, Freddie Loghry, Dora & Mary Dufrain of Momence, Ill., Retta Fornier, Minn; and Myron Loghry of Tuscola Ill. 
Loghry William Henry Harrison (I52778)
 
7138 William I Guillaume; The CONQUERER

He was sometimes called "William the Bastard". This was not meant in
a cruel way, but to show that his parents weren't married and so he
would not inherit unless his father acknowledged him as his son and
there were no other living legitimate heirs, which as the case here.
He was crowned 25 Dec. 1066, Westminster Abbey. 
De NORMANDIE Guillaume I "Le Conquberant" (I22671)
 
7139 William married but had no issue. Brown William (I51013)
 
7140 William Morrison

Posted by Dick Campbell on Mon, 12
Apr 1999

"William Morrison, one of Becker County's earliest white settlers,
was born in Montreal, Canada, March 7th, 1785.

His father was a Scotch immigrant named Allan Morrison, a native of
Stornoway, on the Lewis, one of the Hebrides or western Isles,
forming part of Scotland, and his mother a Canadian French lady named
Jane (or Jessie) Wadin.

William having received a common school education, commenced clerking
in a store in Montreal before he was fifteen years of age.

Montreal was at that time the home and general headquarters of the
British and Canadian fur traders, who came down the Ottawa and St
Lawrence Rivers, in mackinaw boats and birch-bark canoes, every
summer, with their winter's collectionof furs, and returned the same
season, to the far Northwest, with a new supply of goods for the next
winter's business.

The few avenues to fortunes presented to the ambitious young men by
the Canada of that day, coupled with the tales of adventures, and
stories of the large profits made in the fur trade, fired young
Morrison's ambition, and he at the early age of sixteen, was
apprenticed by his father with the Northwest Fur Company, then the
great rival of the more ancient Hudson's Bay Company, and started for
old Grand Portage on Lake Superior, the Company's western
headquarters, with the returning boats.

The next year, in 1802, he was sent to Leech Lake and thence to an
outpost on the headwaters of one of the streams tributary to the Crow
Wing River, from which point they collected furs from their Indian
hunters scattered through what is now Becker and Otter Tail Counties.
These Indians were Pillager Chippewas, and from information gathered
from some of the old Indians I knew at Leech Lake in 1870, and who
remembered well "Sha-gah-nansh-eence," the "Little Englishman," as he
was called by the Chippewas, I would locate this outpost at Shell
Lake.

In 1803-4 Morrison wintered at Upper Rice Lake on the head waters of
the Wild Rice River, and it was during that winter and the spring of
1804 that he visited Lake Itasca and the various smaller lakes which
form part of the source of the Mississippi River. No white man had
ever visited that country before Morrison, and he rightfully claimed
to be the discoverer of the source of this great river, although
Nicollet, Beltrami and Schoolcraft all claimed this honor several
years later.

It being the policy of the Northwest Fur Company not to allow any of
its traders to remain more than one or two years at the game outpost,
Morrison was, in this manner, enabled to visit many places, and
became well acquainted with the fur resources of a vast territory;
the knowledge so acquired soon proved of great value to him.

His industrious habits and natural shrewdness, coupled with his
ability to handle the rough "voyageurs" and his popularity among the
Indians, soon attracted the notice of his employers, and after
several years spent in managing various trading posts tn Minnesota,
he was placed in charge of a number of them, with headquarters at
Sandy Lake, on the upper Mississippi River. It was while stationed
there that an incident occurred, illustrating his popularity with,
and influence over the Indians.

Tecumseh's brother, "The Prophet," had sent out his tobacco to all
the western and northwestern tribes, with a secret message to the
Indians to join him in a general massacre of the whites in the Indian
country.

Such was the reputation and influence of this famous grand medicine
man, the prophet, over the Indians, that although the Chippewas were
of a peaceful disposition and had no great cause of complaint against
their traders, they dared not refuse the invitation. The tobacco sent
was smoked in secret council, the Indians withdrew away from the
trading posts, and generally assumed an unfriendly attitude.

Morrison had left Sandy Lake and gone on a business trip to Fond du
Lac, to meet with the other chief traders and the managing board of
the Northwest Company. While there, messengers came in from Sandy
Lake and a number of other trading posts, with reports, that the
Indians were acting in an unfriendly manner, and that their actions
indicated there was mischief a brewing, but none of the traders'
employes could find out what the trouble was.

The assembled traders decided that Morrison was the only one able to
get the secret out of the Indians, and he started at once for Sandy
Lake, his own post, with the messenger who had brought the report.
They had a light birch canoe and traveled rapidly, so that on the
forenoon of the third day they paddled out of Prairie River into
Sandy Lake.

Some young Indians, who were returning from a deer hunt, recognizing
him, hurried home to spread the news, that the "Little Englishman"
was coming home. From stray hints heard while at Fond du Lac,Morrison
had made up his mind that "The Prophet" was at the bottom of the
trouble, and he soon decided on his plan of action. Paddling close to
the shore he was soon opposite the wigwams of the Indians, but
contrary to custom he never stopped to enquire about the news and
kept on as if in a great hurry. This nettled the suspicious Indians,
and one of them was sent on to intercept Morrison above one of the
small portages which cut across the points formed by the long bends
of the Mississippi River, below the mouth of the Sandy Lake River.
His face was painted black, and as Morrison did not seem to notice
him, the Indian hailed the canoe, when the paddlers stopped. "You
seem to be in great hurry," said the Indian, "what news where you
come from?" "Nothing," answered Morrison, "and what is going on
here?" "Nothing here either." Then Morrison slowly began paddling
away; stopping suddenly, he half turned around saying: "Oh yes, there
is some news I was forgetting. The great medicine man, "The Prophet,"
has been killed by the Long Knives, (the Americans). Then he resumed
paddling and soon reached his stockade, a short distance down the
Mississippi. The next day the Indians flocked in and resumed friendly
relations, without showing the least sign of ill feeling.

As luck would have it, messengers came a few days afterwards from
Lake Superior; confirming his report of the death of "The Prophet,"
and all circumstances connected with the plot came out.

It was a lucky hit. Morrison had calculated that if he could get the
Indians to come around, he would succeed in getting them started out
deer hunting, birch-bark raising, etc., and get them scattered, so
they could not spend their days of idleness in plotting more
mischief.

William Morrison stayed with the Northwest Fur Company until in 1816,
when being offered better inducements, he joined the American Fur
Company (John Jacob Astor's), and was placed in charge of the
department of Fond du Lac, with headquarters at Old Superior,
Wisconsin. This department embracing within its territory, Lake
Vermillion, Red Lake, Sandy Lake, Leech Lake, Lake Winnebagoshish,
Cass Lake, Otter Tail Lake, Crow Wing on the Mississippi, and Grand
Portage on Lake Superior. He remained in charge of John Jacob Astor's
business there until 1826, when having acquired what was called a
competency for those day', he retired from the fur trade and returned
to Canada. There to purchased a large island, since known as
Morrison's Island, in the St. Lawrence River, between Old Fort
William Henry, now Sorel, on the south shore, and Berthier-en-Haut,
on the north shore of the river.

For some years he was engaged in farming, but pastoral life was too
quiet and unexciting for his active mind, and after a few years spent
on the farm, he settled in Berthier, where for many years he carried
on a mercantile business, and was also judge of the county court.

While trading in the upper Mississippi country, he married a Pillager
Chippewa woman, by whom he had two boys and a girl. His wife dying
soon after the birth of the last born, the children were, according
to Indian custom, taken care of by the wife's mother, who always
thereafter followed and lived with her grandchildren. When Morrison
left the Indian country in 1826, he made arrangements to take his
three children with him, but on the eve of the day set for the
departure of the boats, from Superior for Mackinoe, the grandmother
stole the children and disappeared during the night. Search for them
was made for several days, but with-out success, and they were
necessarily left behind. They returned eventually to Leech Lake, and
in course of time the two boys grew to be great hunters and warriors,
and many Sioux scalps dangled from their belts whenever they went out
with a war party.

In spite of their Indian bringing up, and thanks to the good advice
given them by their uncle, Allan Morrison, they never forgot that
they were of white blood, and always exercised their influence over
their reckless tribesmen to keep them from molesting the whites, and
but for the stand take n by Joseph, (or Ay-gans as the Indians called
him), at Leech Lake during the outbreak of 1862, there would have
been a massacre of the employes and traders at the agency.

Hole-in-the-day, head chief of the Mississippi Chippewas, had stirred
up the Pillagers to such a pitch that they had robbed the stores and
made the whites prisoners. They had met in several councils and the
most reckless of them had decided that the whites must die the next
morning. Ay-gans had taken an active part in the councils, but had
always taken the part of the prisoners. At last, when he saw that all
his efforts had been in vain, he got up and spoke about their
comradeship in war and in the hunts, and also on their relationship
to one another and of that law of nature which binds kin to kin, and
then he bared his arm, displaying his light skin, saying: "You are
talking of killing our white friends. and you say they must die
tomorrow. Look at this arm; it is light colored, the blood that runs
through it is white man's blood, and when you kill our white friends
you will kill me also." That last part of the speech was telling. Ay-
gans was a brave man, and his last words, were to Indian ears, both
defiant and threatening. The next morning other brave men took sides
with the whites and their lives were spared. They were marched down
to Gull Lake as prisoners, and turned over to the care of the Gull
Lake Indians, and afterwards liberated.

Descendants of this Jos. Morrison are now settled on the Wild Rice
River in Norman County, but formerly were a part of the first
contingent of Otter Tail Chippewas, who removed with their father to
Becker County in 1872, and settled around the present agency and the
Old Trading Post.

The daughter was taken into the family of one of the missionaries and
followed them to Stillwater, where she married a German farmer, and
died several years ago. Joseph died at Beaulieu, Minn., in January,
1889. His older brother Richard, or Dekaince, died at Otter Tail Lake
about 1870.

William Morrison's second wife was a Miss Ronssain, daughter of a
Fond du Lac, Minn., Indian trader. She was the mother of two sons and
two daughters, and went with her husband to Canada, where she died a
few years afterwards. William, the older of the two boys, left Canada
for the. west and eventually joining one of Col. Fremont's
expeditions to the Pacific coast, went to California, where he
settled and died about 1850.

The younger son, Donald George, left Canada before he was twenty
years of age, and worked his way through Michigan, Illinois and
Wisconsin to Minnesota, where he settled in the Red River valley near
the boundary line, and became a member of the territorial Legislature
of Minnesota. A few years later he settled in Old Superior;
Wisconsin, where he was elected register of deeds of Douglas County,
an office he held for years afterwards. He died in Superior, in 1898.

After the death: of his second wife, William Morrison found himself
with four young children, with none but hired help to manage and care
for them, so after a couple years of this kind of existence, he
married Miss Elizabeth Ann Kittson, an elder sister of the late
Commodore N. W. Kittson of St Paul, Minnesota. Four daughters were
born of that union.

Mrs. Morrison died in February, 1864, and her husband, who had been
blind for several years could not bear up long under the blow. He
aged rapidly after this, and although surrounded by kind friends who
endeavored by their attentions and company, to keep his mind
interested in the events of the day, he lost all interest in life and
gradually passed away. He died on Morrison's Island August 7th, 1866,
and was buried in Sorel, alongside of his last wife.

In religion he was an Episcopalian, and in politics a Conservative,
and a strong supporter of the Canadian government in the troublesome
years of 1837-38, and possessed of much influence with the
authorities. This he used to good advantage after the rebellion, and
was instrumental in saving the lives and liberty of many of his
patriotic friends."

from pages 226 - 232 in the book "A Pioneer History of Becker County
Minnesota" by Alvin H. Wilcox, published in 1907.

A Pioneer History of Becker County,
Minnesota 
MORRISON William (I5839)
 
7141 William served in Company I, 95th Regiment of Illinois Army Volunteers during the Civil War. In the Muster and Descriptive Roll of Company I, he is described as: Rank; Private, Age; 18, 5'9''tall, Light hair, dark eyes and light complexion, not married, a farmer, born in Steuben, NY, joined the service on 7 Dec. 1863 at Woodstock, IL and enrolled by Captain James Nash for a period of 3 years. Mustered into service one day later, December 8, 1863 at Springfield, IL by Lt. Hubb.

On July 25,1865, he was transferred to C. K. 47 Illinois Infantry S. O. NO.122, hold to discharge 16 AC. and was discharged on Aug. 7, 1865 at Springfield, IL by Capt. Hubb.

On the discharge, it gives his home address as Algonquin, IL. 
Brown William C. (I52794)
 
7142 William Wallace and Lettie Leach Brown had only one child; William Wallace Brown, Jr.

In 1870 at the age of 3 years, he lived in Malta, Saratoga county, with a postoffice at Stillwater.
NYS vital records index: William W. Brown d. 7/9/1947, 80y, Malta, #43895 The Saratogian newspaper, Thursday, July 10, 1947. W.W.Brown Dead at 80; Wayville Postmaster. Stillwater - William W. Brown, 80, died Wednesday morning at Manor Rest, Round Lake. His home was at Saratoga Lake, Town of Stillwater. He was born in Malta and for many years ran a store in Wayville, where he was postmaster for 20 years. He retired about 20 years ago. Survivors are one son, W.Wallace Brown Jr., one sister, Mrs. Catherine Starks, Saratoga Springs, two grandchildren, Miss Hazel Brown and W. Wallace Brown 3rd. and several nieces and nephews. The funeral will be held Saturday at 2 p.m. at the J. Dwight Dunn Funeral Home, 319 Park Ave., Mechanicville. The Rev. Earl W. Wooddell, pastor of the Baptist Church of Mechanicville, will officiate. Burial will be in the Stillwater Union Cemetery. Friends may call at the funeral home Friday night
Interestingly, all the census reports say he was born in VT and not in Malta, Saratoga County, NY. 
Brown William Wallace (I52665)
 
7143 William Wallace Brown, 3rd was childless. Brown III William Wallace (I52663)
 
7144 William was a printer in Auburn, possibly working with Samuel Right Brown before the demise of Samuel, on the Cayuga Patriot. He lived at 46 Orchard Street in Auburn, Cayuga county, NY. In 1850, however, he is listed as a Prison Keeper in the Auburn Census.

He married Rebecca Wood/Weed of Preston, Chenango county, NY and had at least two children; Thurlow Weed Brown and daughter, Emma.

After the death of Rebecca at the age of 55 years old, William moved to Fort Atkinson, WI to be with his children where he died in 1878.

In an article published in the Cayuga Republican on 1 Oct. 1828, is mentions the death of Edward Weed, a merchant of Weedsport, aged 32 years, died in Auburn on 30 of Sept. 1828 at the house of his brother-in-law, William Brown, Esq. 
Brown William (I52691)
 
7145 William was an original proprietor of Sudbury. He married Mary, daughter of Thomas Besbeech or Bisby. He was a deacon of the church in Sudbury, freeman on 2 June 1641, a captain and representative under the new charter of 1692. Browne William (I51275)
 
7146 William was in Liverpool, Nova Scotia for a time,living on Coffin Island. He joined his brothers, Isaac and Ephraim there. He came back to fight in the Rev. War for the state of Massachusetts as did his brother, Isaac. An Annable Island is name after the Annble brothers who lived there in Nova Scotia. Annable William (I53226)
 
7147 William was Irish and raised or maintained horses. CHAPMAN William (I1945)
 
7148 William was named after his maternal grandfather, William Loghry. He was 31 years, 9 mos. and 20 days old when he died.

William came to Cameron in 1827 and making a settlement where Charles Johnson later lived. He and his brother, Joseph built a saw mill there. 
Moore William (I54124)
 
7149 William was supposed to be the first Baptist minister ordained on the continent, and thus became the fourth pastor of the Baptist Church of Newport.

William was supposed to be the first Baptist minister ordained on the continent, and thus became the fourth pastor of the Baptist Church of Newport. 
Peckham William (I53891)
 
7150 William was the son of William Weeden. Weeden William (I53951)
 
7151 William was the youngest son, and one of seven children. He became a Methodist minister,being ordained in 1833 and started preaching in Kennebunk in 1834. While he was preaching, he married Frances Allen. They were married in Kittery by her brother, William Allen, who was a lawyer and a judge. As court was in session at the time, her brother brought all of the court officials to the wedding.

He preached for a number of years until his family became larger. He then apparently resigned and took other work that paid better.

At some point, he took his family to Mechanic Falls, NY where he became Depot Master. In the 1850 Census report, Arthur, his son, is living with them. Son, William and daughter, Henrietta are living in Mechanic Falls.

In the 1860 Census report, they were living in Oxford where William was active in the Methodist Church again.

His sons, William,3rd. and Arthur were the first to join the army. Both brothers were wounded in action.

Prior to the Civil War, William took a trip to California. I wonder if this was with a Sheldon Annable and a Wright who went prospecting for gold?
(Mentioned in the "Anable Family of America" by Anthony Anable, 11th generation.)

In the spring of 1864, Rev. William entered the Army as a chaplain after moving his wife and daughter to Portland, Maine. He became ill with pneumonia while at Winchester, Virginia and lost his life while serving in the Civil War. It was reported that the Masons of Portland brought his body back for burial.

His widow, Frances filed for a pension and after much difficulty was able to get a small amount.

The above information is by Ira Brown and family, 1946. 
Brown, Jr. William (I50493)
 
7152 William went by the name of Henry during his life. He married Elenor Jane Townsend,(known by Jane) dau. of Uriah Townsend of Dresden, Yates County,NY. At the time of his marriage, Henry was living in Cameron, NY according to " The Vital Records of Western New York" There is another birthdate of 2 Feb 1815. I don't know which one is correct.

In a letter written from Cameron, March 15, 1880, Charles Loghry, husband to Juliette Brown, sister to Henry; writes to his son, William Henry Harrison Loghry (Henry,the above's namesake) and mentions 'Uncle Henry', William Henry Harrison Brown.



Cameron, March 15, 1880

Well Henry Loghry it has bin A long time since we have heard from you you dont rite very often and today I thaut that I woud rite you a few lines to let you noe that we are in the land of the living but not very smart this winter I have bin qite poorley this winter and lame not abel to doe my chores nor to cut my wood I am giting old and will soon be out of this world and it wont mater how qick if I am prepard for that day that day will surly come prepared or not Ada and her man is with us this winter and will stay with us this year or that is the talk now if nothing hapens. We have had A very warm winter and noe snow it has bin rather unheathy this winter. A grate many old fokes has dropt off this winter some without one moments warning there are several that has dropt dead seting their chair and it stands us in hand to be ready to meet it if we never meet on this earth less try to meet in heaven your unkel Em Brown* is very poorley this winter he lais A bed the most of the time he haint bin from home in nine years he is nothing but skin and bones.
the rest of the family is well but hard up this winter they had their barn burnd and all their hay and grain and it is touf for them this winter I hurd form you unkel Henry Brown* the other day he is bad off he dont noe hardly any thing and the man told me that they had lost ther property he thout it was all used up they sold out but dident saave mutch
that is bad to loes his senses and property to
times is beter this spring that it has bin for sevel years past money is plenty and proptery is chang hands and things looks beter now than they have for some time
Wheat is 140 rie 90 corn 65 oats 50 potatoes 40 Apels from 50 to 65
hay is from $10 to $12 tone
give my best Respects to all the frends and tell them that I would (like) to see them very much I would like to see you and your wife today and have you hear
tell Juliaette* to rite to us I will rite to her before long now Henry rite soon as you git this and till us how you are giting A long

from your father
(signed)
Charles Loghry

* 1. unkel Henry Brown is William Henry Harrison Brown, brother to Juliette, Charles first wife.
2. Juliaette is Charles'granddaughter by William Henry Harrison Loghry and Elizabeth Williams.

At the time the 1870 Federal Census was taken for Torrey, Yates County, it shows that William and Jane were living next door to Wright Brown, Jr., his uncle.

William went by the name of Henry during his life. He married Elenor Jane Townsend,(known by Jane) dau. of Uriah Townsend of Dresden, Yates County,NY. At the time of his marriage, Henry was living in Cameron, NY according to " The Vital Records of Western New York"

William and Jane lived next door to Wright Brown, Jr. and his wife, Emily in Torrey in 1870.

In another data base on Ancestry.com he is listed as being born on 2 Feb. 1815 in Auburn, Cayuga Co., NY. 
Brown William Henry Harrison (I52924)
 
7153 William White, a wool carder, perhaps related to the White family of Sturton le Steeple, was one of the first twelve men on the Mayflower who were in a position to be called Mr. or Master because of social or economical status. He was a leading "stranger" who joined the Mayflower journey to America.

Little is known about Pilgrim William White. He and Susanna White left England with son, Resolved. At Cape Cod, on Nov. 11, 1620 according to the old calendar, William was one of the forty-one signers of the Mayflower Compact. Two to three weeks later, son Peregrine was born, the first English birth in Plymouth Colony. Susanna was widowed in February. Their two servants died about the same time. Susanna became the first colony bride in May, marrying Edward Winslow, a Mayflower passenger who had lost his wife a few weeks before. At least five children were born to Susanna and Edward Winslow.

SUMMARY:
The ancestry of William White of the Mayflower is not known. Incorrect royal lineages have been given for him, as well as an incorrect identification of him as the son of Rev. John White of London.

William Bradford wrote that William White came on the Mayflower with his wife "Susanna". There is a marriage record in Leyden on 27 January 1612 for a William White, woolcomber, and an "Anna" Fuller, sister of Samuel Fuller. The marriage was witnessed by Sarah Priest and Samuel Fuller. This record, however, does not relate to the Mayflower passenger, as commonly claimed. The reasons for this conclusion are as follows:

A William White had Sarah Priest witness his marriage; a William White in 1621 witnessed the marriage of Sarah Priest. However, the William White of the Mayflower was dead in America and could not have witnessed Sarah Priest's marriage. It would therefore appear that this is not the William White who came on the Mayflower.

Susanna, widow of William White, married second Edward Winslow. Anna Fuller was baptized in 1577, and Edward Winslow in 1595. It is most unlikely that 25-year old Edward Winslow would marry a woman 18 years older than him for his first wife.
Children of William White were buried in infancy in 1613, 1615, and 1616. These deaths indicate it would be most unlikely they had a child Resolved in 1615.

Susanna, wife of William White, is not Susanna Tilley either, another common claim. That "theory" was disproved in Pilgrim Notes & Queries 1:1. 
WHITE William (I10055)
 
7154 William Wright, Esq. from Swansey, b. Nov. 23, 1813, married Nov. 29, 1838, Larina, daughter of Daniel Buffum. After living a few years on the Deacon Amos Garnsey farm, he removed to the Enoch Whipple place, and from thence to the Naromore place, now owned by Andrew Dodge, where his wfe died May 30, 1872. Is a justice of the peace; has frequently been on the board of selectmen and has represented the town in the General Court. Had two children; L. Warren, b. Jan. 27, 1842; Lucy J. born april 7, 1840 who married Preston L. Freeman. (The Hisotry of Richmond, Cheshire County, NH, by William Bassett, p. 537-538.) Wright II William (I51763)
 
7155 William, from Norwich, CT., was the inventor of the "Woodworth Planning Machine". Woodworth William (I53324)
 
7156 William, well educated and an Alderman of London was the son of John and Anne Russell Vassall. He was a man of some wealth who was one of the original patentees of New England lands and Massachusetts Bay Company and was one of Craddock's Assistant at the time he was made acting Governor of the Massachusetts Company of London.

In 1630, Vassall came to New England on the "Arabella" with John Winthrop from Prittlewell, Essex County, England, but returned to London in 1631 in the ship "Lyon", being chosen with his brother by the colonist to present their petitions of complaints against Endicott's government to Craddock in England. He returned, leaving London 17 June 1635 in the ship, "Blessing" at age 42 years with his wife, and six children, whom he left in Roxbury while he built his house at Scituate on the beautiful location overlooking river, marshes and ocean. It was known as "Belle House" on his plantation, 'West Newland.'. (NEHGR 17:56; Deane, Scituate, p. 366; Pope) They became members of the Scituate Reformed Church.

William became involved in the religious and political life of both colonies. He became a follower of Rev. John Lathrop, a religious refugee from London who was also quite controversial. In 1646, finding himself out of sympathy with the colonial leaders and seemingly ran afoul of his neighbors because of the Child Petition, Vassall went back to England, and in 1648, without returning to Scituate, went to Barbados and had estates in both Barbados and Jamaica where he became even more wealthy. Some evidence exists that he dealt heavily in the slave trade.

He died and is buried in the Parish of St. Michael in 1655. In his will, dated 13 July, 1655, he names his son, John and his daughters, Judith, Francis, Ann, Margaret and Mary. (NEHGR 17:57)

BIOGRAPHY: The following is from "The Vassalls of New England":

He was the first of his name who came to this country, was an Assistant in the Massachusetts Bay Company, and one of the original patentees of New England lands. At a formal meeting of the Governor and Company held October 15, 1629, he, with others, was appointed "to go over," and in the next year he arrived in this country, but returned after a short stay, in the ship Lyon. In June, 1635, he embarked with wife and six children on board the Blessing, for New England. Upon his arrival here it would seem that he settled first in Roxbury; for we find in the Church Records of that town the following entry made by the Rev. John Eliot in his account of the church members: "Mrs Anna Vassaile, the wife of Mr. William Vassaile. Her husband brought five children to this land, Judith, Frances, John, Margaret, Mary." (and one other, Ann, afterwards married to Nicolas Ware). How long he remained at Roxbury we do not know, but, November 28, 1636, we find him connected with the church at Scituate, in which town Deane says he erected a house in 1635, on land laid out to him by order of the Court, and which he called West Newland. He took the oath of fidelity at Scituate, February 1, 1638. In December, 1639, license was granted him "to make an oyster bed in North River," before his house. In 1642 he was chosen one of a council of war, aggressions having been threatened by the Narragansetts, and in 1643 his name appears on the militia roll. In 1644-5 he was prominently concerned in the division of the church at Scituate, and the settlement of Mr. Witherell over the disaffected portion, against the advice of protestations of the churches at Plymouth and Marshfield. The separation of the churches arose partially from the views held by its pastor, the Rev. Charles Chauncy, upon the ordiannce of baptism, with whom Mr. Vassall had early disputed on dotrinal points. (for an interesting discussion of the subject see Deane's "Scituate".) In 1646 he sailed for England, in the Supply, in aid of a petition for the redress of wrongs in the government, and never returned, but in 1648 removed to Barbadoes, and there died in 1655, aged 65 years. His will is dated at Barbadoes, July 13, 1655. He bequeathed to his son John one-third of all his estates, and the remainder to his daughters, Judith, Frances, Ann, Margaret, and Mary. His son was appointed executor, and in his absence Nicolas Ware, who appointed, May 8, 1656, Capt. Joshua Hubbard of Hingham, his attorney for the sale of the Scituate estate, by virtue of two writings, one signed by Resolved White and James Adams, February 18, 1656, and the other by Margaret and Mary Vassall, March 3, 1655-6. The estate was conveyed by Joshua Hubbard to John Cushen and Mathyas Briggs, for £120, and consisted of about 120 acres, with house and barns. The deed was signed by Joshua Hubbard, Resolved White and Judith his wife, and James Adams, July 18, 1657.

According to Adventurers of Purse & Person, Virginia 1607-1624/5 by Virginia M. Meyer/John Frederick Dorman, 1987 (Abstracted):

John VASSALL, father of William, was a subscriber for two shares of stock in the Virginia Company with an investment of £25.10.0 in 1618, and was the son of John VASSALL, a Huguenot of Normandy, sent into England by his father because of the troubles in France. In 1588 John, of county Essex, England, fitted out at his own expense and commanded two ships, the Samuel and the Little Toby, to help repel the Spanish Armada. The arms granted to him by queen Elizabeth I in consequence of this service were adopted by his family thereafter n place of those used by his French forebears. John VASSALL m (1), 25 Sept. 1569, Anne HEWES [HUGHES], who died without issue, (2), 4 Sept. 1580, Anne RUSSELL of Ratcliffe, Co Middlesex, buried 5 May 1593, and (3), 27 March 1594, Judith (BOROUGH [ABOROUGH]) Scott, daughter of Stephen BOROUGH and his wife Joan OVERYE of Stepney and of Chatham, County Kent, and widow of Thomas SCOTT of Colchester, County Essex. John VASSALL was an alderman of London and also a vestryman in Stepney Parish, Co Middlesex, where his three marriages took place. In a deposition made in 1610, John VASSALL described himself as of Eastwood, Essex, and aged 62. He died 13 Sept. 1625 of the plague and was buried at St. Dunstan, Stepney. His will, dated 29 April 1625, proved 16 Sept. 1625, named his wife Judith and his children. His wife, Judith VASSALL of Eastwood, Co Essex, died testate, her will dated 09 Nov. 1638, proved Jan. 1638/9.

Issue of John VASSALL by Anne RUSSELL included Judith, baptized 25 March 1582; d after 29 April 1625; married John FREEBORNE of Prittlewell, Essex (will dated 27 Jan. 1617/8, proved 17 Feb. 1617/8); Samuel; John, born 14 March 1589/90, died 30 Aug. 1591; and William. By his third wife, Judith BORROUGHS (Scott), John VASSALL left issue: Anna, born 10 Jan. 1595/6, buried 24 July 1640, married John JONES, rector of St. Nicholas Acons, London, who died 14 May 1636 at Highgate, Middlesex; Rachel, who m Peter ANDREWES of Ratcliffe, Middlesex (d 1650); Stephen, who matriculated Pembroke College, Cambridge, 1616, with a B.A. 1619/20, and an M.A. 1623, later the rector of Rayleigh, Essex, died 1643, married (1) Mary BROMLEY of Orsett, Essex (d 30 Jan. 1632/3), and (2) Mary GRUBB(E) of St. Alban's , Hertfordshire, b 2 Jan. 1614/5, who resided at Rayleigh when she made a deposition in 1646, aged 30; Thomas, born 7 April 1602, of St. Leonard, Eastcheap, London, when he married and of Whitechapel, London, in 1651, who m 27 June 1625 at St. Nicholas Acons, London, Anne DICKENSON; Mary, who married Edward WEST of Ratcliffe, a mariner; Elizabeth, born 1607, of Ratcliffe, Middlesex, m, 20 Jan. 1625/6 at St. Nicholas Acons, London, Henry CHURCH, born 1602, of Wapping, Middlesex.

William VASSALL'S son John VASSALL, born about 1625, served as a lieutenant of militia, 1652, and later as captain, at Scituate, Mass. John VASSALL sold his New England holdings by 1661 and moved to the West Indies, then or later. He engaged also in the settlement of Cape Fear, NC, was appointed Surveyor General of "Our County of Clarendon" by the Proprietors, 24 Nov. 1664, and in 1667 applied for relief to be sent to his followers and himself. By April 1670 he was in Virginia where as "Colonel" John VASSALL he was chosen as guardian, on 24 Feb. 1670/1, by his nephew John WARE. Col. John VASSALL married Anna LEWIS, daughter of John LEWIS, an English resident of Genoa. On 17 Dec. 1671 John VASSALL gave a power of attorney to his wife Anna, and Edward LEWIS, had apparently left Virginia by 17 March 1672/3 when his wife was acting in his behalf, and clearly was away by 9 April 1674. His plantation of 1170 acres in Old Rappahannock County, now Essex, which he bought from John WEIR, 7 Jan. 1667/8, was sold to Mrs. Honoria WEIR, 13 July 1671. He was a resident of Jamaica when he made his will, 10 Aug. 1684-6 July 1688, which mentioned his wife and children. His widow was naturalized there, 20 July 1685, and was buried 23 Feb. 1719/20 (will dated 20 Feb. 1719/20, proved 2 April 1720).

William VASSALL'S daughter, Anna VASSALL, born about 1629, married, before July 1655, Nicholas WARE of Old Rappahannock County, merchant, who was named executor of the will of her father and purchased Resolved WHITE'S portion of their father-in-law's estate, 17 March 1656/7, and Mary VASSALL'S portion, 11 May 1657. As a merchant of St. Michael's, Barbados, 3 Jan. 1661/2, Nicholas WARE gave bond to John VASSALL of Barbados to secure payment to VASSALL for "four good negroes." Their son, John, born 19 Oct. 1656, probably the John WARE who married Mrs. Elizabeth MORGAN and left will dated 24 July 1703, proved 29 March 1704, which mentioned wife Elizabeth, son John WARE, daughter Elizaeth WARE and sons-in-law [stepsons] Anthony and Robert MORGAN. (Adventurers of Purse & Person, Virginia 1607-1624/5 by Virginia M. Meyer/John Frederick Dorman, 1987)

Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620-1691, Eugene Aubrey Stratton, FASG, Ancestry, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT, 1986, pp. 365-6provides some additional data abt additional descendants of William VASSALL (d ca1655, Barbados):

"William VASSALL, born ca. 1593, the son of John VASSALL, an alderman of London. William and his brother Samuel VASSALL were among the original patentees of the Massachusetts Bay Company. William came to New England in 1630 as a Bay Colony Assistant, but returned to England after a short while� In 1635 he sailed aboard the Blessing, at age forty-two, with his wife Ann, age forty-two; and children Judith, sixteen; Frances, twelve; John ten; Ann, six; Margaret, two; and Mary, one; and settled at Roxbury in the Bay Colony. Shortly after, however, he moved to Scituate, the Plymouth Colony town closest to the Bay Colony (NEHGR 17:56; Deane, Scituate, p. 366; Pope). His involvement in the religious and political life of both colonies can be seen in the text. He left in 1646 for England in connection with the Child petition, and never returned to New England. He later moved to Barbadoes, where he was quite prosperous, and he died there in 1655. In his will, dated 13 July 1655, he named his son John, and his daughters Judith, Frances, Ann, Margaret, and Mary (NEHGR 17:57). VASSALL'S wife was Ann KING, and she was possibly related to the Thomas KING who also sailed on the Blessing and settled at Scituate (see NEHGR 109:95). Of their children, Judith married Mayflower passenger Resolved WHITE and their descendants can be found in MF 1, and Frances married James ADAMS, son of John ADAMS, q.v. Son John VASSALL was on the 1643 ATBA for Scituate, and in 1652 he was a lieutenant under Capt. James CUDWORTH, but later left the colony. Daughter Ann married Nicholas WARE, and daughter Margaret married Joshua HUBBARD (also seen as HOBART) (Torrey, p. 377)�Though William himself seems to have had no Virginia connection, his son John and his daughter Anne, wife of Nicholas WARE, were residents of Rappahannock Couty, Virginia, and his brother Samuel died on a voyage to Virginia. Additional information on William VASSALL is given in Roger D. Joslyn, "The English Origin of John Stockbridge and His First Wife Ann," (NGSQ 74:111)

Note: Elsewhere, Stratton states that John STOCKBRIDGE'S wife, Ann, was neè KENDALL, and that she was among those who, with the VASSALLS, were members of the Scituate Reformed Church (See Combs &c. Families of the Plymouth Colony, MA)

One John VASSALL appears as a headright in the land patents of Virginia on 20 Aug 1650 (Isle of Wight - VA Patent Book 2:240) by Robert BLAKE & Samuell ELDRIDGE, 560 A. described as "Lyeing upon the third swamp SW by W from Henry WHITE'S plantation." Other headrights included: John CLEMENTS, Edw. ALCHARD, Jo. STORREY, Wm. BATTS, Eliza. PHILLIPS, Richard WALTON, Mary MARTIN, Martha COLE, Tho. SYER, and Wm. BALDWINN. (Cavaliers & Pioneers, Vol. I, Nugent, p. 197) Question: Could SYER be SAYER? See Also John CLEMENTS of Talbot Co MD associated with the Combs-Roe Families.

John VASSALL was in Old Rappahannock Co VA on 04 Jul 1670 (Old Rappa. DB7:108-111) when he witnessed the indenture between "William UNDERWOOD Senyr. of the Parrish of Sittingborne in the County of Rappa.:" and Mr. John FOXHALL of Pope's Creek in the County of Westmoreland, Merchant," the former being the son of Col. Wm. UNDERWOOD whose widow, Elizabeth, had married by 1663 Archdale Combs I of Old Rappa. Co VA, and the latter having been the father-in-law of one Alexander GORGES whose relationship to Sir Ferdinando & Mary ARCHDALE Gorges remains unknown thus far (we're working on it).

Apparently the relationship between Nicholas WARE and John WEIRE of Old Rappa. Co VA also remains unknown. That there was one seems probable based on the close associations between the two families. John WEIRE appears in the records of Lancaster Co VA by 04 Sep 1650 when he witnessed a deed between Richard COLEMAN and Wm. VEALE & John VAUSE for land on the south side of the Rappa. River [later Old Rappa. Co, then Essex], adj. George MOSELY. (Lancaster Court Orders, 1652-1655, p. 206, Fleet's Col. Abstracts). Note: William VEALE d testate with will dated 1693 (apparently not extant) in which he deeded land in (Lancaster > Old Rappa. >) Essex Co VA to his grandson, Charles Combs (unidentified).

A patent for 500 A land in Gloucester Co VA, dated 25 Mar 1655/6, for Peter FORD included as a headright one John WARE, the land described as "Cacamount on the northeast side of Mettopony [Mattapony] River beginning at a lower tree of Capt. Robert ABRALL, behind land of Mr. BARNHOUSE & Mr. William WYATT�"

John WEIRE had married Honoria (----) before 1659 when Honour [/] WEIRE gave her assent to sale of property in Old Rappa (Old Rappa Records, Part I 29 Sep 1656-1 Jul 1662, p. 48). (Exact date missing) (Sparacio); and was deceased by 1678 when his will was probated in Maryland:

7th May, 1671 - 28th Apr., 1678 (Maryland Wills, Liber 9, Folio 78) Will of Major John WEIRE of Rappahannock Co., Va. To wife Honoria, dower rights. To daughter-in-law Margaret, wife of John WATTS of Potomac R., and hrs., part of a tract of land, 1,108 A., bought of Henry RANDOLPH of Jamestown ( of sd. tract having already been sold to Robert PAYNE). To dau. Eliza: and hrs., "The Island" at 21 yrs. of age. To son John and hrs., residue of lands in Va. and elsewhere. Exs.: Son-in-law Jno. WATTS, Wm. MOSELY, Capt. Jno. HULL. Test: Jno. BATES, Luke HUMBLETON, Jno. JEFFERY. (Maryland Calendar of Wills: Volume 1, p. 208)

It is not known if John WEIRE d in VA or MD (or elsewhere), but it appears probable that "The Island" was a Maryland tract. Robert PAYNE and Abraham Combs of Old Rappa. Co VA & St. Mary's Co MD (where he d in 1684) were godparents to the children of John & Joane (Combs?) Meador, with Abraham self-titled the "brother-in-law" of John MEADORS. (See also below). It also appears, based on his use of the phrase "daughter-in-law" (step-daughter) that John WEIRE was not Honoria's first marriage (not researched). Witness William MOSELEY was the uncle (somehow) of William UNDERWOOD, Sr., the above-referenced step-son of Archdale & Elizabeth UNKNOWN Underwood Underwood Combs of Old Rappa. Co VA (whose relationship to Abraham and Charles Combs remains unknown, albeit highly probable that there was one).

By 04 Sep 1684 John WEIRE'S widow, Honoria, had already married and buried George JONES of Old Rappahannock, and was acting as Administratix of JONES' estate. (Old Rappahannock OB, 1683-1686, p. 40 (55), Old Rappahannock Order Book Abstracts, 1683-85, Ruth & Sam Sparacio, Antient Press, McLean, VA, 1990) George JONES had been a co-administrator in 1679 with Amory BUTLER of the estate of Col. John CATLETT, h/o of Elizabeth UNDERWOOD, sister of Col. Wm. UNDERWOOD whose widow, Elizabeth, had m Archdale Combs.

Honoria (-----) Unknown Ware Jones had died by 04 Jan 1685/6 when her will, dated 21st Oct 1685 was recorded in the Old Rappahannock Co VA Court:

"Will of Honoria JONES, widow & Relict of Mr. George JONES, being sick & weak of body, but � to my Daughter Margaret BLAGG, that seat� of land wch I purc. of Colnll. John VASSALL lying & being on South Side of Rappa. River contaying Eleven hundred seventy & five acres the sd land to be at her absolute sole disposall for ever� to my Daughter Elizabeth GARDNER my Wedding Ring wch joyned me and my Husband Majr. John WEIRE in Matrimonie� to my Son In Law Mr. Abraham BLAGG 20 Shillings to buy him a mourning Ring� to my son Richard GARDNER, a knife a ring of the aforesd value� to my Grandchild Richard WATTS, one Silver .. Grandson, Edward BLAGG, same aforesaid� to my Grandson Edward BLAGG same aforesaid� Grandson Luke GARDNER the same � Grandson Jno GARDNER the same� Daughter Margrett BLAGG, Wife of Mr. Abraham BLAGG to be my sole Executrix.. S/Honoria JONES. Wits: James HARRISON, Andw. [AO] ONEBY, Michael BASSEY, Prvd. 21 Dec 1685 by BASSEY, Wits. Henry AWBREY, Geo. TAYLER. Rec. 4 Jan 1685/6. (Old Rappa. WB2:84-5, Old Rappahannock VA Wills, Ruth & Sam Sparacio, McLean, VA)

By John WARE, Honoria had issue, Elizabeth who m bef 1680, Richard GARDNER (d 1687); however, in his will, he refers to Margaret as his "daughter-in-law (step-daughter) which may mean that he was not Honoria's first husband. Her daughter, Margaret, m (1) John WATTS; (2) Abraham BLAGG (d 1697/8, Westmoreland Co VA). Abraham BLAGG appears in the records of St. Mary's Co MD with Abraham Combs, his (Westmoreland?) land appears in the records of King George Co VA adjacent to the Combs Land. He is found in the records of Richmond Co VA (from Old Rappa. Co) with John Combs, s/o Archdale Combs I.

4 Jun 1694-31 Mar 1697/8 (Westmoreland WB2) Will of Abraham BLAGG [I], Est. to wife Margaret. (Westmoreland Wills, Fothergill)

6 Oct 1716-28 Nov 1716 (Westmoreland WB6) Will of Abraham BLAGG [II]. Mother Margaret BLAGG exx; son Abraham; my bro. Richard WATT'S children; personal est. to son and wife; if mother dies, William REED exr. (Westmoreland Wills, Fothergill)

18 May 1724 - 27 Jul 1726 (Westmoreland WB8) Will of Margaret BLAGG. All my est. to my grandson Abraham BLAGG [III] when 18 years of age; James HORE his uncle to advise him. (Westmoreland Wills, Fothergill)

Notes: How was James HORE uncle to Abraham BLAGG III? Was he kin to the much later Walter HORE, 2nd husband of Virginia Combs, d/o William Rousseau Combs and Sarah WICKLIFFE of Stafford Co VA?

Another question arises in respect to the WARE/WEIRE Families and that is whether they were descended from the WARRE Family of Hestercombe, Co Somerset, EN where in 1566, one Richard WARRE who may have been the following, gave a deposition in respect to the Combs of that county:

From Burke's Family Records by Ashworth P. Burke, 1897, p 616, the lineage of the WARE Family:

Mathew WARRE, Serjeant-at-Law, was son of Robert LAWARRE, by his wife, the dau. and heir of Kentesbeere. He m. Alice, dau. of William DENBAULD, and left a son and heir, John WARRE, who m. the dau. and heir of John MERIET, of Hestercombe, and by her had a son and heir, Richard WARRE, of Hestercombe, m. Joan, dau. and heir of John ATWOODE, and by her had a son, Richard WARRE, m Joan, dau. and heir of John COMBE, of Dalwood, Dorset, and by her had issue: John WARRE who m. Joan, dau. of Walter STAPLETON, of Brushwood, and had a son, Robert WARRE, living 22 Henry VI [ca1444], who m. Christian, sister of Richard HANGFORD, and had a son, Richard HANGFORD, and had a son, Richard, was m. Joan, dau. of Lord STURTON, and d.s.p. 22 Edward IV [ca1483]. (Note: All of the above marriages before 1640) 
Vassall William (I50273)
 
7157 Winifred's maiden name is unknown. She was first married to an unknown, Mr. Crawford and by inference of the Probate records ,(MBCR1:132) they lived in Watertown. He was drowned in the Charles River, along with his brother and a servant. A small boat, they overloaded with goods and hogshead, upset and dumped all into the river. This was recorded by Rev. Winthrop to have occurred on 12 Aug. 1634. ( WJ 1:165) The widow Crawford married twice more after this incident; John Woolcott and Thomas Allyn of Barnstable. Crawford Winnefred (I53453)
 
7158 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F1242
 
7159 wit. by Horace & Jehiel Family F5343
 
7160 wit: ? Fletcher and Ahlufiues?/Anlupies? Family F3401
 
7161 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Family F1333
 
7162 wit: Peter O'Connor & Elizabeth Payette Family F1225
 
7163 wit: William Blette and Mary Severait? Family F1348
 
7164 With his fathers family moved to North Stonington, CT in 1701 where his father died in 1703. In 1706 when administrator was granted of the fathers estate to Sarah, the mother, and Peter Davison, brother of the deceased, Josiah is recorded as age 14. No record of guardianship has been discovered for any of his father’s children, nothing is known of him in the ensuing five years, to 1711, though a minor, probably acting for himself, from foregoing deeds to him. Josiah had learned the “Potters” trade at age 19 years and was doing business. He afterwards is described as a “Carpenter” and finally as a “Miller”.

Josiah Davisson’s family has become a legion in numbers and in force from ocean to ocean. It is very important that from the day he settled at Wading River, Long Island, until his grandson came out of the dark ages of Virginia. No vital records exist other than a few preserved in Bible and court deeds and records. The fables of family tradition have in a way, aided to locate persons and places.

The seven sons of Josiah Davisson of Millstone, NJ with the possible exception of two, went to Virginia, and Daniel was the first to go. He located in that part of Augusta Co. which is now Rockingham, first on “James Branch”, 1746. During the next 20 years, the older sons of Josiah followed. About 1780 they or their sons were inhabitants of what is now Harrison Co., WV. “The Davisson’s” who are all descendants of Josiah are one of the strong lines of descent from our common ancestor, Daniel Davison, 1630-1693, the “Exile”.

At about 40 years of age, Josiah, for some reason became Davisson. He had eight sons, six of whom took the new name and have sent it down to the present. The reason for this change is shrouded in mystery, but some have believed it was on account of ill will toward Robert Davison of the Monmouth, NJ family. Josiah came to the Millstone Valley below where Princeton now is situated in 1736, with limited means. He purchased thirty-three acres of land, including the site of the Aqueduct Mills, and in a quarter of a century acquired the lands upon the east side of the Millstone up to the Cranbury branch. Here he found Robert Davison in the forks of the streams with Scotch determination to remain, an unverified tradition says. A line fence sometimes makes better enemies, so it may be imagined that Josiah, who had until then non but yielding competition, may have thought this reason enough for putting a new thread in his tartan. This is not history, only tradition, possibly a myth. 
DAVISSON Josiah (I34709)
 
7165 Withstood threats from the British and was one of the Ojibway chiefs
that remained nuetral in the war of 1812. Moved the tribe to Lac du
Flambeau.

He was born in Indian lands, Michigan Territo. !"Principle chief of Lac du Flambeau", Crane totem, Chippewa (Ojibway) nation. 
Stone) Keesh-ke-mum (Sharpened (I9302)
 
7166 Witnesses: Adolph Brustman and Celia Tripp. This marriage to sister of deceased 1st wife. Family F17943
 
7167 Wm. Henry Annable came to Michigan after Millie's birth, after Mary's death in May 1865 and before the 1870 Census. However, he had purchased 460 acresof land in Ionia Co. on June 5, 1858. (Per Register of Deeds Ionia County, Michigan; "William H. Annable of Saratoga, Saratoga County, New York", paid $4200 legal money for 460 acres in Sections 26 and 27 in Township 7 R 7.)

Census References Year State Co. Vol. E. D.
Line Name Age Rel. (Born:Yr. & Pl.)
_____________________________________________________________________________
1850 Census New York

Annable, Wm. H. 1829 NY
(see note for William Annable)

1860 Census New York

Anable, William 58 Head 1802 New York
Anable, William H. 31 Son 1829 New York

1870 Census Michigan Ionia County
1880 Census Michigan Ottowa 22 247

17 Annable, Wm. H. 49 Head 1829 New York
18 Annable, Louisa 30 Wife 1850 Michigan
19 Annable, Wesley 20 Son 1860 New York
20 Annable, Mary 19 Dau 1861 New York
21 Annable, Millie 16 Dau 1864 New York
22 Annable, Nellie 9 Dau 1871 Michigan

Info from Ottowa County Death Records, book 2, p. 34, line 30.
He is listed as William W. (sic) Annable, died in Jamestown, age 56, married. He is said to have died of "Exzemia". All particulars are correct except middle initial. To ascertain that this was william H. Annable, a copy of the Probate Record of the estate was obtained. The record left no doubt that this was the father of Estella Annable Sprague, for she is named in the record. The contents of the Probate Record state that William H. Annable died on the 11th day of September, 1885. 
Annable William Henry (I53468)
 
7168 Woodlawn Cem. MALLORY Ethel Mae (I5337)
 
7169 Worked all his life for the N. P. as section boss and gang-foreman. BISSON Madest (I1086)
 
7170 Worked for the Toledo & ann Arbor Railroad PULSIFER Albert (I6772)
 
7171 Worked in old capital in St. Paul. BISSON Mary (I1093)
 
7172 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I1055)
 
7173 World War Beteran. Died soon after the war in Seattle, burried there. BISSON Leo (I1083)
 
7174 Wright County, census book, # 42, 111-115
1925 Census for Iowa, Wright County, Book 42, p.111-115 
Source (S1426)
 
7175 Wright Jr. is the fourth child of Wright Sr's second marriage.

His father and mother moved him and the rest of their family to Milo, Yates County, in 1808 from Providence and earlier, Stillwater, Saratoga County, NY. They left their farm in Stillwater which was located on the battlefield where his father had fought during the Revolutionary War. No land records can be found there. It is thought they may have rented the farm in Stillwater before moving on to Providence.

He father, Wright Sr., homesteaded forty acres in Torrey (Milo) and later gave a portion to his son, Wright Jr. to which he added many more acres. The homestead was still in possession of the family as late as the death of Wright Jr. in 1874. I do not know if it still remains in the Brown family today.

Wright Brown, Jr. was always regarded as a substantial citizen and was called upon to discharge public duties in various capacities among his neighbors and it is believed with universal satisfaction. He was also a man of inquiring mind and generous spirit and it was said that his life was truly a blessing to those associated with him and his death was a greater loss to others than to himself, for he had lost his sight and sat in darkness for many years and had suffered much from a nervous derangement due to an unsuccessful operation. (Taken from his obituary.)

Wright enjoyed being one of the first Masters of the Masons in Torry.
This was taken out of a family bible owned by Marjelia Chubb and past down to her grandson, D. Michael Beard of Arlington, TX. Also, in this Bible, there is a reference someone had written in pencel,"Who is Sam Brown?" Sam was Wright's half-brother by his father's first marriage to Hannah Newland.



Census Report of 1825 Milo, Yates County, NY for Wright Brown, Jr.:
3 males and 2 females.

Census Report of 1855 Torrey, Yates County, NY for Wright Brown:
Brown, Wright 59, b. Saratoga County, NY
Emily (wife) 42, b. Cayuga County, NY
Margaret Rebecca, 14, dau. Yates County, NY
Richard, 12, son, Yates County, NY
Justina, 6, dau, Yates County, NY

DEATH: Fran Dumas, Yates County Historian, says that an obituary of Wright Brown, Jr. says he died on 21 June, 1874.
Vital Records Extracted from the Yates County Chronicle, 9 July 1874.
Editor: Stafford C. Cleveland
May - July 1874

Died at his residence in the town of Torrey, Wright Brown, Esq., on Sunday June 28th, aged 78 years. Mr. Brown has been a resident of the locality since 1808, and was the son of Wright Brown, who was born in New Hampshire in 1750, and was associated with his father in the French war and afterwards in the Revolution, participating in the battle at White Plains and at Stillwater, Saratoga County, and after the war, settled on the farm which was the battlefield of that memorable event, the "Stillwater farm." Althought he had served through the war seven years, he sternly refused to accept a pension for his services, to the day of his death, from personal pride and early educational influences.

It was at this farm in Saratoga Mr. Wright Brown of whom we write, was born, June 1, 1796, and he was the fourth child of a second marriage.

Mr. Brown, the father, was induced to emigrate to this section and in1808 settled on what remained his homestead about forty acres, and also formed a portion of the homestead of the son during his life, and he having added many acres to it. Mr. Brown, Jr. married Emily King of Port Byron, and they have four children; Sarah D., Margaret R., Richard K; and Justina S. The last two named are unmarried and reside on the homestead with their mother.

Mr. Brown has always been regarded as a substantial citizen and was called upon to discharge public duties in various capacities among his neighbors and it is believed with universal satisfaction. He was also a man of enquiring mind and generous spirit and it may truly be said that his life has been a blessing to those associated with him and his death a greater loss to others than himself, for he has sat in darkness for many years from the loss of his sight and suffered much from a nervous derangement consequent upon an unsuccessful operation resulting in his blindness.

Wright Brown's will is at the following location in Penn Yan, Yates county, NY: Penn Yan county court house.

Brown Wright 1874 42B Richard, Emily B & Joshua Brown; Sarah Beard. Who is Joshua?

One of the first Masters of the Masons in Milo.


Appeared in the Yates County Chronicle newspaper on 9 July 1874 by Stafford C. Cleveland, Editor:
Died at his residence in the town of Torrey, Wright Brown, Esq., on Sunday June 28th, aged 78 years. Mr. Brown has been a resident of the locality since 1808, and was the son of Wright Brown, who was born in New Hampshire in 1750, and was associated with his father in the French war and afterwards in the Revolution….[The] Mr. Wright Brown of whom we write was born June 1, 1796, and he was the fourth child of a second marriage. Mr. Brown the father was induced to emigrate to this section and in 1808 settled on what remained his homestead about forty acres, and also formed a portion of the son during his life, he having added many acres to it. Mr. Brown married Emily King of Port Byron, and they have four children—Sarah D. Margaret R., Richard K. and Justina B. The two last named are unmarried and reside on the homestead with the mother. 
Brown Wright S. (I52708)
 
7176 Zoe Laramee d/o ???m.Sept.14-1863 Penetang.to Elie Brisette s/o
Hyppolite&Archange Hirondelle.
Eli BRICETTE, n/g, Simcoe Co, Penetanguishene, s/o Hippolyte BRICETTE &
Archang CRISSONDELL, married Zoe LARAMME, n/g, Simcoe Co., Penetanguishene,
no parents given, wtn: Edmond BRICETTE & Merende BOUCHER, both of
Penetanguishene, on September 14, 1863 
Family F24876
 
7177 Zoeth, who was killed by Indians and whose descendants accumulated a great fortune in land and whaling and which was later famed as the Hetty Green fortune. (The Edminister Family of America, Part III, Descendents of Henry William and Roba (Howland) Edminster.) Howland Zoeth (I52376)
 
7178 [Aaron Root Decendants 1-10-2002.FTW]



"...It is now November [1817], and two families have settled near the center. I will mention first Mr. Aaron Root's family, already in their log house, built by their oldest son, Pomeroy, during the summer [1817] , one-half mile west of the center [ Grafton Township in then Medina County, Ohio now Lorain County]. Mr. Root was from Pittsfield, Berkshire County. Mr. Root, while a widower in Pittsfield, with five children, was married to Mrs. Anna West with five children; three became members of Mr. Root's family. They were called Uncle Aaron and Aunt Anna during their life time. Their children's names were [John] Pomeroy, Samuel, Ashley and Mary Root, Caroline, Albert and Clarinda West. The two youngest born to this couple were Frederick and Oliver."
from Pg. 259 - Grafton History as written by Mrs. Harriet I. Nesbett who arrived in Grafton township with her family in 1816-1817.

Founding member of the Lorain Agricultural Society ( today the Lorain County Fair). Wed. April 29, 1846.

Elected to the first board of directors; The Lorain Bank, Elyria, Ohio. Bank established May 24, 1847; Aaron elected June 23, 1847 by vote of the shareholders. 
ROOT Aaron (I13641)
 
7179 [Aaron Root Decendants 1-10-2002.FTW]

Grafton county ohio History 1878 Pg 263
.....Oliver Root, a babe of weeks only then, is the youngest pioneer that came to Grafton, and has remained a resident since November, 1817. 
ROOT Oliver (I13737)
 
7180 [Aaron Root Decendants 1-10-2002.FTW]

In the 1900 Census, Frederick Root (age 53) lived with his wife Reise (age 46) and their son Ashley (age 14) in Toledo, Lucas Co, OH. Frederick indicated that he was a doctor and owned the house where his family lived. Frederick indicated that he was born in Ohio, and his parents were born in New York. Reise indicated that she was born in Ohio, and her parents were born in New York. They indicated that their son Ashley was born in Ohio. This census record indicated that they had been married for twenty-four years.

In the 1910 Maricode Census Index, Fredrick Root (age 64) is living with his wife Reise (age 55) with his son Ashley (age 24), his daughter-in-law Ella (age 24), and granddaughter Elizabeth (age 6) and grandson Fredrick (age 1) in Toledo, Lucas Co, OH. This record indicated that Fredrick was born in Ohio, his wife Reise was born in Ohio, and two grandchildren born in Ohio, and daughter-in-law born in Michigan. 
ROOT Frederick Augustus (I13501)
 
7181 [Aaron Root Decendants 1-10-2002.FTW]

In the 1910 Census, Ashley Root (age 24) lived with his wife Ella (age 24) and children Elizabeth (age 6) and Fredrick (age 1) in their father's home located in Toledo, Lucas County, Ohio.

In the 1920 Census, Ashley Root (age 34) lived with his wife Ella (age 34) and their two children Elizabeth (age 16) and Fredrick (age 11) in Toledo, Lucas Co, OH. Ashley Root indicated that he was a cost clerk for an automobile manufacturer. Ashley Root indicated that he and his parents were born in Ohio. Ella indicated that she was born in Michigan, and her father was born in Ohio, and her mother was born in Pennsylvania. Both of the children were born in Ohio. 
ROOT Ashley Frederick (I13669)
 
7182 [Aaron Root Decendants 1-10-2002.FTW]

Known to Fred, Olive, Allen and Jim Root as Uncle "Doc" Delivered Freddie. Attending nurse his first wife Helen Harriet. Also delivered Allen and Jim. 
ROOT Aaron Delos (I13722)
 
7183 [Aaron Root Decendants 1-10-2002.FTW]

Military Service.
Root, Oliver.List of men who marched from Pittsfield to Kinderhook after inimical persons May 4, 1777, under command of Capt. John Strong, and were dismissed May 11, 1777; service, 1 week; also, Private, Capt. William Francis's co., Maj. Caleb Hyde's detachment of militia; entered service July 8, 1777; discharged July 26, 1777; service, 19 days, in Northern department; also, list of men who marched from Pittsfield to Fort Edward July 8, 1777, under command of Capt. William Francis, and were dismissed Aug. 26, 1777; service, 7 weeks; also, Private, Lieut. James Hubbard's co., Lieut. Col. David Rositer's detachment of militia; entered service Aug. 17, 1777; discharged [p.556] Aug. 22, 1777; service, 4 days; company marched on an alarm; also, list of men who marched from Pittsfield to Bennington Aug. 19, 1777, under command of Lieut. James Hubbard, and were dismissed Aug. 24, 1777; service, 5 days.

Root, Oliver.Lieutenant, Capt. William Francis's 9th (2d Pittsfield) co., Col. Benjamin Simonds's (2d Berkshire Co.) regt. of Mass. militia; list of officers chosen by the several companies in said regiment; ordered in Council May 4, 1776, that said officers be commissioned; reported commissioned May 3, 1776; commissions reported dated June 1, 1776; also, Captain; list of men who marched from Pittsfield to New York July 11, 1776, under command of said Root, and were dismissed Dec. 5, 1776; service, 21 weeks; also, Captain, Col. Jonathan Smith's regt.; list of field, staff, and commissioned officers [year not given]; also, Captain, 2d Matross co., 2d Berkshire Co. regt. of Mass. militia; list of officers; commissioned Jan. 27, 1779; also, official record of a ballot by the House of Representatives, dated March 21, 1780; said Root, Captain, chosen 2d Major, Col. Rosseter's (3d Berkshire Co.) regt. of Mass. militia; appointment concurred in by Council March 21, 1780; reported commissioned March 21, 1780; also, Major, Col. John Brown's regt.; appointed July 3, 1780; discharged Nov. 1, 1780; service, 3 mos. 24 days; regiment raised for 3 months; roll dated Pittsfield; also, Major, in command of a detachment of militia ordered out of Brig. Gen. Rosseter's brigade on the alarm at Saratoga of Oct. 29, 1781; service, 8 days; also, Major, in command of a detachment from Col. Caleb Hyde's (Berkshire Co.) regt.; entered service Nov. 9, 1781; discharged Nov. 15, 1781; service, 6 days, on an alarm at the Northward; regiment raised by order of Brig. Gen. David Rosseter to reinforce army under Gen. Stark at Saratoga; roll sworn to at Pittsfield. 
Col Oliver ROOT (I13588)
 
7184 [Aaron Root Decendants 1-10-2002.FTW]

Real Estate owned valued at $3,570 according to the 1850 census 
PEABODY Lyman B (I13612)
 
7185 [Aaron Root Decendants 1-10-2002.FTW]

Sarah was Oliver's second wife according to DAR Vol 59 Page 295 ID # 58865 
BURBANK Sarah (I13682)
 
7186 [Aaron Root Decendants 1-10-2002.FTW]

The first grave made in Grafton was for Frederick, the oldest born of Aaron Root's second marriage, who died soon after the family settled in the township. In their affliction, they sent to Brunswick, Medina county, for Rev. Jacob Ward, a Methodist minister and former friend and neighbor in Pittsfield. The oldest son was sent for Mr. Ward and they made their way as fast as possible through the five-mile woods from Liverpool, but night coming on, they were obliged to tie their horses and with saddles for pillows, spent the cold, rainy November night in the woods. Lorin County Ohio History 1879 
ROOT Frederick A (I13643)
 
7187 [Aaron Root Decendants 1-10-2002.FTW]

Turner probably not her Maiden name as record indicates "the Widow Turner"
1850 census gives "Ruth" as her name; J.P. Root, 1870 indicates "Olive" 
Turner Olive Ruth (I13488)
 
7188 [Aaron Root Decendants 1-10-2002.FTW]

Was born in Charlestown township, Portage county, Ohio, September 19,m 1822. He remained with his father on the farm until he was sixteen years of age, when he removed to Windham, in his native county, and attended the academy of that place, going through a regular academic course of studies. In the spring of 1842 he commenced reading medicine with George Conant, M.D. subsequently prosecuting his medical studies with Professor John C. Delamater, of Cleveland, in whose office he remained as a student until the spring of 1845 when he was regularly graduated and received his diploma. He soon thereafter moved to Grafton, Lorain county, and entered upon the practice of medicine, which he followed until the winter of 1851 and 1852. During the latter year he turned his attention to the study of dentistry under Dr. Kellogg of Cleveland, with whom he remained almost one year. He then returned to Grafton where he continued to reside until the spring of 1860 at which time he removed to Elyria and engaged in the active practice of dentistry in which he continued until 1875. He then disposed of his dental practice to Dr. White, and moved to Oberlin, where he practiced until September, 1878, at which time he returned to Grafton where he oversees the business of his farm and also practices his profession. Dr Knowlton married Caroline C., daughter of William and Mary Kinney, who were among the early settlers of Grafton. They have one son, William E. Knowlton, who resides at home with his parents. In politics Dr. Knowlton is a republican having acted with that party many years. He is generally considered a first-class professional man, an honest man and a good citizen. Lorain County History 1879 
KNOWLTON Cyrus B (I13689)
 
7189 [Connecticut Vital Records for the township of Brooklyn shows an entry for Samuel and Abigail's marriage as 5/15/1750.] Family F19505
 
7190 [MKH Note: Genevieve and her older brother Joseph were both married in Québec on the same day. A joyous day for the Normand family - a double wedding!] Normand Geneviève [III] (I39567)
 
7191 [MKH Note: Joseph and his youngest sister Genevieve were both married in Québec on the same day. A joyous day for the Normand family - a double wedding!]

PRDH Individual 57408: Joseph NORMAND
Father: Jean NORMAND
Mother: Anne LELABOUREUR
Birth: 1669-001-10
Baptism: 1669-01-13, Québec
Death: 1749-12-21
Burial: 1749-12-22, Québec

First marriage: 1691-02-05, Québec
with
Marie Madeleine TREFFLE ROTOT
Father: Francois TREFFLE ROTOT
Mother: Catherine MATHIEU

Second marriage: 1693-10-29, Québec
with
Marie CHORET
Father: Robert CHORET
Mother: Marie Madeleine PARADIS

[MKH Note: Peter J. Gagné, in his book Before the King's Daughters: The Filles à Marier, 1634-1662 p. 198 (Anne Le Laboureur) states that Joseph was baptised at Québec City on 12 January 1669, while the PRDH has the date as the 13th.]:

PRDH Baptism 58274: Québec, 1669-01-13; Birth: 1669-01-10
01 Joseph LENORMAN; - c p m
02 Jean LENORMAN; Father of 01; Spouse of 03; - m p m
03 Anne LELABOUREUR; Mother of 01; Spouse of 02; - m p f
04 Romaine BECQUET; Occupation: Notaire; - - p m
05 Louise DEMONCEAUX; Spouse of 06; - m p f
06 Pierre PELERIN STAMANT; Spouse of 05; - m - m
07 Henri DEBERNIERES; Occupation: Prêtre; - c p m

PRDH Burial 169040: Québec, 1749-12-22; Death: 1749-12-21
01 Joseph LENORMAND; Occupation: Bourgeois; Residence: Québec; 084 - d m
02 Joseph DESCARREAUX; - - p m
03 Guillaume TAPORIN; - - p m
04 J F RECHER; Occupation: Curé; Residence: Québec; - c p m
===============================================

On 04 November 1695, Jean and Anne disinherited their son Joseph (notary Peuvret), but revoked this act on 15 and 31 May 1700 (notary Genaple). 
Normand Joseph [III] (I39593)
 
7192 [or b.Aug. 5, 1780 d.Apr. 26, 1861 m.Cynthia Rea--different sources conflict] FARNHAM David (I38152)
 
7193 [or July 14, 1800] FARNHAM John (I38157)
 
7194 [Wm Tapley Court Case 1719/4 Boston MA PLT Trespass Index No.607837, Vol/pg 7/6, Box/Fire 12-3] TAPLEY William (I38054)
 

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