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Brown Samuel Right[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6]

Male 1817 - 1909  (91 years)


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  • Name Brown Samuel Right 
    Born 17 Nov 1817  Dresden, Yates Co., NY Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Died 04 Feb 1909  Cary Station, McHenry Co., IL Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Buried 06 Feb 1909  Cary Cemetery, Cary Station, McHenry Co. IL Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Notes 
    • Samuel Right Brown Jr. was born about 2 months after his father died in Dresden, Yates County, NY. He married Sarah ( Sally) Ann Coss of Bath or Cameron, Steuben County, NY and had 10 children.

      In early life, Sam settled on the Robert Water's farm on North Hill, Cameron which he bought of John Sherer, where he resided for eleven years. He ran a saw mill and rafted lumber on the river for a time. In 1852, he walked to Astubula, Ohio and assisted in clearing the site of the present city of Oberlin, Ohio. His brother-in-law, George William Loghry had gone there earlier and there married his first wife. Also, George's sister, Letty had gone to Astubula (Oberlin) to live with the Schocks (in-laws of her brother, George) after her mother died when she was thirteen years of age.

      In 1855, Samuel is listed in theTorrey, Yates County, NY Federal Census. His mother, Eunice, was 72 years of age at the time and living with this family. He moved his wife and children to Algonquin Township, McHenry County, Illinois after first settling in Kankakee, Kankakee County for a short period sometime around 1856.

      He followed his older brother, Erasmus Darwin Brown, who settled in St. Anne, Kankakee County after Erasmus and family had lived a few years in Fountain County, Indiana. Samuel and Sally's son, Melvin was born in St. Anne, Kankakee County on 3 April, 1858. After two years in the Kankakee area, Samuel moved north to Algonquin, McHenry County to be closer to his wife's sisters, Lucy Coss, wife of Asa L.Weaver and Matilda, wife of David Miller, both of Algonquin Township who had come to the area about the same time.

      Upon arrival in Algonquin, Samuel and Sally rented a farm on which was an old house. It was partly covered with timber. He cleared off the land, drained it and put up a good set of buildings, to which a silo and other improvements were added. For years, Samuel made butter for private customers in addition to carrying on his farmings, becoming one of the well-known men of his community. In the 1860, Samuel was listed as a farmer. In 1870, a stonemason and still living in Algonquin. Living with the family in 1870 was Althea Brown, age 18, wife of his son, Samuel Right Brown, the 3rd. She was born in Illinois. Thomas Morin, age 38, born in Canada and was a farm laborer also lived with them.

      On December 3, 1902, Samuel lost his wife, Sally. They are buried next to each other in the Brown family plot at Cary Cemetery, McHenry County, Cary, IL.


      Prior to his death in 1909, he had been retired for seventeen years. He was the eldest Mason in the state. In Buffalo, NY. He also ate breakfast with the son of Sacajawea, the guide for Lewis and Clark on their expedition to the West. He helped organize the Algonquin Mutual Insurance Company in 1874. The Brown family was one of the best known ones in McHenry County, and its members during their long residence there have been connected with some of the most constructive work of their section, and were recognized as being typical of the advanced spirit which seemes to have prevailed in this portion of Illinois. (From The History of McHenry Co., IL, 1922.)

      In a letter below, written by Charles Loghry (brother-in-law to Samuel) to his son, Henry in the 1850s, he writes;

      "Sam Brown has got home from the asilum and seams to bee all rite he Chops wood every day Brown's foxes (folks) is well and doing well they are in the the hoop pole business this winter."

      It is apparent from letters written by Charles Loghry about his brother-in-law, Samuel Right Brown, Jr., he suffered some type of illness where he had to be institutionalized.

      It is commonly believed that some form of mental illness was present in several of the Annable families according to a few descendants, thus shedding some light on the mental problems of Henry (William Henry Harrison Brown) and Samuel Brown, sons of Eunice Annable and Samuel Right Brown, Sr. In early history on the Peckhams family (Eunice Annable Brown's paternal grandparents side) there is mention of the "idiot" in the family back in the early 1700's.

      Samuel was very involved in the town of Cary Station once he moved there from Algonquin. He as well as his daughter, Julia Ann worked very hard, keeping the local cemetery beautiful and peaceful-looking. It was in this light that he, FayetteThomas, E. Sprague and John Brandon each purchased a family monument of white Bronze, of T. D. Warwick, agent for a Detroit company. The first three named erected their monument in the Cary cemetery, which the Crystal Lake Herald article of March 3, 1882 , mentioned, 'will add much to its improvement. Mr. Crane of Janesville, who has done all in his power to improve our cemetery will be gratified to see those having relatives and friends buried here taking an interest also.'

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      The following is an obituary notice for Samuel R. Brown, Jr.

      February 11, 1909; Crystal Lake Herald, Crystal Lake, McHenry Co. IL



      THE DEATH ROLL

      Three Aged Ones Fall Beneath the Scythe of Time

      Samuel R. Brown of Cary--Mrs. T. H. Ashton of Ridgefield- Mrs. Robert Baxter of Chicago

      Samuel R. Brown was born in Dresden, Yates County, NY, November 17, 1817, and died at his home in Cary, Ill., February 4, 1909, aged 91, years, 2 months and 17 days.

      He was married to Sally Ann Coss of Bath, Steuben County, NY, Jan 1, 1844. The family consisted of six sons and four daughters-S. R., Jr., E. D., Melvin and D. M., Mrs. Martha Osgood, Julia A. and Mrs. Dora Raue.

      He resided in New York state until 1856, coming west and locating in McHenry County, where he resided until his death.

      He was left fatherless in early infancy, and was thus thrown upon his own resources. He traveled on foot from his native state to Ashtabula County, Ohio, where the present city of Oberlin now stands. He helped the early pioneers of that section to clear the site of that city. Later in life he became an expert raftsman, piloting rafts down the Canisteo and Susquehanna rivers.

      For seven years he owned and operated a sawmill at Cameron, Steuben County, N. Y., and after coming to Illinois engaged in farming on his farm, located near Cary.

      His father, Samuel R. Brown, was associated in journalism with Soloman Southwick, at Albany, N. Y., and employed as a typesetter, Thurlow Weed, who afterward became a noted journalist and politician of New York city. His father was also an author of considerable prominence, one of his noted works being "The Western Gazetteer." He was also a volunteer in the War of 1812.

      Mr. Brown was a man of sterling worth and strong convictions, kind and sympathetic in his nature, always generous to the needs of others, and his hospitality knew no bounds. He was of a cheerful, happy disposition, and ever ready to lend a helping hand to those in need. He was possessed of a modest, retiring nature, and only his most intimate friends could fully appreciate his worth. He was a great reader, and inherited from his father a love for literature. He was especiallly fond of Scott's poems, and after failing eyesight prevented him from reading, he delighted in quoting from this favorite authors up to a very short period previous to his death.

      The community in which he resided is certainly better for his having lived in it. His was a noble character, and worthy of emulation. He was a member of the Masonic order for the past 61 years, having joined that order in Bath, N. Y., in 1848, later transferring his membership in Nunda Lodge 169, in 1867. (* 5. * 5Date could be later.)

      Impressive funeral services were held at the M. E. Church on Saturday, Feb. 6, at 11 a. m., conducted by Rev. A. N. Foster of the Universalist church of Elgin. Music by the M. E. choir.

      At the conclusion of the service at the church, the remains were tenderly laid to rest in the family lot, where the beautiful and impressive burial service of the Masonic order was given. The many lovely floral tributes attested the love and esteem in which he was held.

      The following appropriate line from Bryant were read by the officiating clergyman:

      I saw an aged man up on his bier,
      His hair was than and white, and (the rest is unreadable)

      ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      The letters below, written in 1868, 1869 and 1880 seem to indicate Samuel and Sally were still in New York in the late 1860s but the census report for the township of Algonquin, McHenry County, IL show Samuel and Sally living there in 1860. Their son, Melvin was born in April, 1858 in Illinois, probably in Algonquin.

      These letters were written by Charles Loghry to his son, William Henry Harrison Loghry. In them he mentions the mental condition of Samuel and that of his brother, William Henry Harrison Brown (Henry). Charles Loghry was married to Juliette Brown, sister to William and Samuel.


      Alens Station, N. Y. August 30, 68 (1868)

      Well henry it has bin some time sinse I have rote to you. We had A leter from you A short time a goe and was glad to hear that you and your family was well and was doing well.
      We are as usual working and tuging through this world and triing to git something to live on when we Cant work any more. We have had it very dry this sumer. Spring crops is very poor this year hear and as been as I can hear. Corn aint more than half a crop.
      When you git this you must tell us how times is with you. We had A good crop of hay and winter wheat but Barley and oats was lite this year potatoes is A lite crop I have a good croop of buckwheat.
      I am going to rite to franklin Loghry*. I begin to think that he has forgotten us it has ben A long time sinse he has rote to us. tell him to rite and let us noe what he is doing.
      We have had the hotest weather that was ever none in this country. it was so hot it was all most imposibel to work.
      I have sowed one peis of wheat and am redy to sow five acors more this week. I have had the falow ready two weeks.
      We are well to day and nobody but us two hear. Ada* is to sunday school while I am riting.
      You must come and make us a visit as soon as you can. You must rite as soon as you git this and let us noe how you git along.
      You must doe what you can for Seymour and Blain the Democrats will carie this state by A big majority as was ever nown.
      Give my respects to unkel Dar* and Lety* and all their fokes.
      Good by for this time
      to Henry Loghry and wife (signed

      Charles Loghry


      *1. Franklin Loghry is his son.
      2. Ada was a girl they had taken in to raise.
      3. Unkel Dar is Erasmus Darwin Brown, brother of Juliette Brown Loghry, and brother-in-law to Charles.
      4. Lety is Lettice Loghry Brown, a sister; one of the three Loghry Children to marry three Brown children.
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      Cameron, N.Y. Dec 26, 1869

      Well Henry it is some time sinse I have rote to you. I thout this morning I woud rite to you and let you noe that we are in the land of the living and as well as usual. I have in qite lame this fall and winter I have got A bad nee that is very lame and pains me very bad so that I cant sleep good nites. it was taken lame last summer and is giting worse. I have got most discourage of its ever giting any beter I haint ploud any this fall help is hard to git and wages is high hear.
      Comon labor is one dollar A day and bord and wheat is worth $1.00 for that is good
      You rote that you wanted me to send you some money that is out of the question this winter for money is hard to git and very scarce there is nothing that will fetch money hear.
      we have had some cold wether and good slaying But this warm today and raining there aint mutch going on this winter hear Sam Brown* has got home from the Asilum and seams to bee all rite he Chops wood evry day Brown's foxes* is well and doing well they are in the hoop pole business this winter
      Henry you must keep good Courage your young yet and you mustent git the horers for that dont doe any good if I was of your age and had my health I could live any where I think that I can doe as much as I ever could But when I goe to work I soon git tierd and soon think difernt I have worked this fall that when I got in the house and sot down I had all that I could doe to git up I have the rheumatism most all the time
      My nee pains me so that I can hardley rite while I am now riting
      We got a leter from your wife on Chrismuss for A Chrismuss present and was glad to hear that you was well and all the friends
      I wish that you was hear today to hellp us eat some Big Aples we have the Bigest Aples that you ever seen David Williamson was hear last sunday and he meshered one that was 14 inches round we have got 20 bushels of grafted aples in the seler
      Good By for this time rite soon as you git this
      We like to hear from you often as we can
      Direct to Alens Station
      (signed)
      C. Loghry
      * 1. folks
      2. Sam Brown is Samuel Right Brown, Jr.; a brother to Charles's first wife, Juliette.
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      Cameron, March 15, 1880

      Well Henry Loghry it has bin A long time since we have heard from you you dont rite very often and today I thaut that I woud rite you a few lines to let you noe that we are in the land of the living but not very smart this winter I have bin qite poorley this winter and lame not abel to doe my chores nor to cut my wood I am giting old and will soon be out of this world and it wont mater how qick if I am prepard for that day that day will surly come prepared or not Ada and her man is with us this winter and will stay with us this year or that is the talk now if nothing hapens. We have had A very warm winter and noe snow it has bin rather unheathy this winter. A grate many old fokes has dropt off this winter some without one moments warning there are several that has dropt dead seting their chair and it stands us in hand to be ready to meet to meet it if we never meet on this earth less try to meet in heaven your unkel Em Brown* is very poorley this winter he lais A bed the most of the time he haint bin from home in nine years he is nothing but skin and bones.
      the rest of the family is well but hard up this winter they had their barn burnd and all their hay and grain and it is touf for them this winter I hurd form you unkel Henry Brown* the other day he is bad off he dont noe hardly any thing and the man told me that they had lost ther property he thout it was all used up they sold out but dident saave mutch that is bad to loes his senses and property to. times is beter this spring that it has bin for sevel years past money is plenty and proptery is chang hands and things looks beter now than they have for some time
      Wheat is 140 rie 90 corn 65 oats 50 potatoes 40 Apels from 50 to 65
      hay is from $10 to $12 tone
      give my best Respects to all the frends and tell them that I would (like) to see them very much I would like to see you and your wife today and have you hear.
      tell Juliaette* to rite to us I will rite to her before long now Henry rite soon as you git this and till us how you are giting A long

      from your father
      (signed)
      Charles Loghry

      * 1. unkel Henry Brown is William Henry Harrison Brown, brother to Juliette, Charles' first wife.
      2. Juliaette is Charles'granddaughter by William Henry Harrison Loghry and Elizabeth Williams.

      * 5. In the above letters, it mentions that Samuel Right Brown, Jr. was still living in Cameron, NY in 1868. His arrival date in Illinois appears to be at a much later date. Membership in the Masonic Lodge was transferred to the Nunda Lodge in 1867. That date could be wrong.


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      Last Will and Testament of S. R. Brown, Sr. (Jr.) Deceased.
      Filed McHenry County, ILLS. Feb. 19, 1909, G. F. Rushton, Clerk County Court


      Know all men by these presents, that I, S. R. Brown Sr. of Cary Station, Illinois, being aged but of sound and disposing mind and memory, do make and publish this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all former wills by me at any time heretofore made.

      As to my worldly estate, Real or Personal I dispose thereof in the manner following--

      First my will is, that all my just debts and funeral expenses shall by my exectutors hereinafter named, be paid ou of my Estate as soon after my decease as shall be found by them convenient,

      Item- I give devise and bequeath my entire Estate to be divided equally between my sons S. R. Brown Jr., E. D. Brown, Melvin Brown, and D. M. Brown, and to my daughters Julia Brown, Martha Osgood, and Dora Raue and my Grandson Dexter D. Brown, share and share alike.

      In the event of the death of my son S. R. Brown, Jr. before my death the bequeath as relates to him shall be void and his daughter being my Grand daughter, Alice is to receive One Thousand ($1,000.00) Dollars.

      Lastly I do nominate and appoint my daughter Julia Brown, and my son E. D. Brown the executors of this my last Will and Testament.

      In testimony whereof, I the said S. R. Brown Sr. have to this my last Will and Testament contained on one sheet of paper, subscribed my name and affixed my seal this 14th. day of August A. D. 1906.

      S. R. Brown Sr. (Seal)


      Signed, sealed, published and delivered by the said S. R. Brown Sr. as and for his last will and testament in the presence of us who at his request, and in his presence and in the presence of each other, have subscribed our names as witnesses thereto.

      Luna E. Mentch, Cary Station, Illinois.
      Foy L. Mentch, Cary Station , Illinois.




      In the History of McHenry County, IL , Vol. 2, pp 497-98, the following but not intirely accurate:

      Samuel Right Brown, now deceased, was born at Bedford, Mass.,(he was born in Dresden, Yates Co., NY. His mother was born there) Nov. 17, 1817, and died at Cary, Ill., Februdary 2, 1908, having lived in retirement in that village for some seventeen years prior to his demise. He married at Bath, NY to Sallie Ann Cass (Coss), born June 3, 1817, at Bath, NY. After his marriage he came to Kankakee, IL. where a brother, Darien E. (Erasmus Darwin) Brown had already located, and about two years later, Samuel R. Brown came to McHenry County, to join Mrs. Brown's two sisters, Lucy, who was Mrs. A. L. Weaver; and Matilda, who was Mrs. David Miller, both of Algonquin Township, where their husbands had secured land from the government. Samuel R. Brown rented the farm he later bought, on which was an old house. It was partly covered with timber. He cleared off the land, drained it and put up a good set of buildings, to which a silo and other improvements have since been added. For years Mr. Brown made butter for private customers in addition to carrying on his farmings, becoming one of the well-known men of his community. On December 3, 1902, Mr. Brown had the misfortune to lose his wife. They were the parents of the following children: William C., who enlisted when only sixteen years old in Company I, Ninely-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under Captain James Nish, and he served through the Civil War, coming out of the conflict without any wounds but with his health so impaired that he died fifteen years later; Samuel K., (Samuel R., III) who is a well-known stockman, lives at Cary with his sister; Martha, who is the widow of Mark Osgood, also lives at Cary; Charlotte, who died at the age of eighteen years, had attended the academy at Elgin; Julia, who lives at Cary, is a very progressive lady, who during the World War was active in Red Cross work, and belongs to the Woman's Club, Royal Neighbors and Ladies' Aid Society; Darwin who is a prominent man and successful farmer of Lake County, IL; Melvin , who is deceased, was a prominent cement contractor, and passed away at Wancenda (Wauconda) IL in 1913; Daniel M., was a milk dealer of Chicago for some years, was educated in the Elgin Academy; and Dora, who married Ben Rand (Raue) of Crystal Lake, died when about fifty years of age. The Brown family is one of the best known ones in McHenry County, and its members during their long residence here have been connected with some of the most constructive work of their secation, and are recognized as being typical of the advanced spirit which seems to prevail in this poration of Illinois.

      Samuel Right Brown Jr. was born about 2 months after his father died in Dresden, Yates County, NY. He married Sally Ann Coss of Bath or Cameron, Steuben County, NY and had 10 children.

      In early life, Sam settled on the Robert Water's farm on North Hill, Cameron which he bought of John Sherer, where he resided for eleven years. He ran a saw mill and rafted lumber on the river for a time. In 1852, he walked to Astubula, Ohio and assisted in clearing the site of the present city of Oberlin, Ohio. His brother-in-law, George William Loghry had gone there earlier and there married his first wife. Also, George's sister, Letty had gone to Astubula (Oberlin) to live with the Schocks (in-laws of her brother, George) after her mother died when she was thirteen years of age.

      In 1855, Samuel is listed in theTorrey, Yates County, NY Federal Census. His mother, Eunice, was 72 years of age at the time and living with this family. He moved his wife and children to Algonquin Township, McHenry County, Illinois after first settling in Kankakee, Kankakee County for a short period sometime around 1856.

      He followed his older brother, Erasmus Darwin Brown, who settled in St. Anne, Kankakee County after Erasmus and family had lived a few years in Fountain County, Indiana. Samuel and Sally's son, Melvin was born in St. Anne, Kankakee County on 3 April, 1858. After two years in the Kankakee area, Samuel moved north to Algonquin, McHenry County to be closer to his wife's sisters, Lucy Coss, wife of Asa L.Weaver and Matilda, wife of David Miller, both of Algonquin Township who had come to the area about the same time.

      Upon arrival in Algonquin, Samuel and Sally rented a farm on which was an old house. It was partly covered with timber. He cleared off the land, drained it and put up a good set of buildings, to which a silo and other improvements were added. For years, Samuel made butter for private customers in addition to carrying on his farmings, becoming one of the well-known men of his community. In the 1860, Samuel was listed as a farmer. In 1870, a stonemason and still living in Algonquin. Living with the family in 1870 was Althea Brown, age 18, wife of his son, Samuel Right Brown, the 3rd. She was born in Illinois. Thomas Morin, age 38, born in Canada and was a farm laborer also lived with them.

      On December 3, 1902, Samuel lost his wife, Sally. They are buried next to each other in the Brown family plot at Cary Cemetery, McHenry County, Cary, IL.


      Prior to his death in 1909, he had been retired for seventeen years. He was the eldest Mason in the state. In Buffalo, NY. He also ate breakfast with the son of Sacajawea, the guide for Lewis and Clark on their expedition to the West. He helped organize the Algonquin Mutual Insurance Company in 1874. The Brown family was one of the best known ones in McHenry County, and its members during their long residence there have been connected with some of the most constructive work of their section, and were recognized as being typical of the advanced spirit which seemes to have prevailed in this portion of Illinois. (From The History of McHenry Co., IL, 1922.)

      In a letter below, written by Charles Loghry (brother-in-law to Samuel) to his son, Henry in the 1850s, he writes;

      "Sam Brown has got home from the asilum and seams to bee all rite he Chops wood every day Brown's foxes (folks) is well and doing well they are in the the hoop pole business this winter."

      It is apparent from letters written by Charles Loghry about his brother-in-law, Samuel Right Brown, Jr., he suffered some type of illness where he had to be institutionalized.

      It is commonly believed that some form of mental illness was present in several of the Annable families according to a few descendants, thus shedding some light on the mental problems of Henry (William Henry Harrison Brown) and Samuel Brown, sons of Eunice Annable and Samuel Right Brown, Sr. In early history on the Peckhams family (Eunice Annable Brown's paternal grandparents side) there is mention of the "idiot" in the family back in the early 1700's.

      Samuel was very involved in the town of Cary Station once he moved there from Algonquin. He as well as his daughter, Julia Ann worked very hard, keeping the local cemetery beautiful and peaceful-looking. It was in this light that he, FayetteThomas, E. Sprague and John Brandon each purchased a family monument of white Bronze, of T. D. Warwick, agent for a Detroit company. The first three named erected their monument in the Cary cemetery, which the Crystal Lake Herald article of March 3, 1882 , mentioned, 'will add much to its improvement. Mr. Crane of Janesville, who has done all in his power to improve our cemetery will be gratified to see those having relatives and friends buried here taking an interest also.'

      ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

      The following is an obituary notice for Samuel R. Brown, Jr.

      February 11, 1909; Crystal Lake Herald, Crystal Lake, McHenry Co. IL



      THE DEATH ROLL

      Three Aged Ones Fall Beneath the Scythe of Time

      Samuel R. Brown of Cary--Mrs. T. H. Ashton of Ridgefield- Mrs. Robert Baxter of Chicago

      Samuel R. Brown was born in Dresden, Yates County, NY, November 17, 1817, and died at his home in Cary, Ill., February 4, 1909, aged 91, years, 2 months and 17 days.

      He was married to Sally Ann Coss of Bath, Steuben County, NY, Jan 1, 1844. The family consisted of six sons and four daughters-S. R., Jr., E. D., Melvin and D. M., Mrs. Martha Osgood, Julia A. and Mrs. Dora Raue.

      He resided in New York state until 1856, coming west and locating in McHenry County, where he resided until his death.

      He was left fatherless in early infancy, and was thus thrown upon his own resources. He traveled on foot from his native state to Ashtabula County, Ohio, where the present city of Oberlin now stands. He helped the early pioneers of that section to clear the site of that city. Later in life he became an expert raftsman, piloting rafts down the Canisteo and Susquehanna rivers.

      For seven years he owned and operated a sawmill at Cameron, Steuben County, N. Y., and after coming to Illinois engaged in farming on his farm, located near Cary.

      His father, Samuel R. Brown, was associated in journalism with Soloman Southwick, at Albany, N. Y., and employed as a typesetter, Thurlow Weed, who afterward became a noted journalist and politician of New York city. His father was also an author of considerable prominence, one of his noted works being "The Western Gazetteer." He was also a volunteer in the War of 1812.

      Mr. Brown was a man of sterling worth and strong convictions, kind and sympathetic in his nature, always generous to the needs of others, and his hospitality knew no bounds. He was of a cheerful, happy disposition, and ever ready to lend a helping hand to those in need. He was possessed of a modest, retiring nature, and only his most intimate friends could fully appreciate his worth. He was a great reader, and inherited from his father a love for literature. He was especiallly fond of Scott's poems, and after failing eyesight prevented him from reading, he delighted in quoting from this favorite authors up to a very short period previous to his death.

      The community in which he resided is certainly better for his having lived in it. His was a noble character, and worthy of emulation. He was a member of the Masonic order for the past 61 years, having joined that order in Bath, N. Y., in 1848, later transferring his membership in Nunda Lodge 169, in 1867. (* 5. * 5Date could be later.)

      Impressive funeral services were held at the M. E. Church on Saturday, Feb. 6, at 11 a. m., conducted by Rev. A. N. Foster of the Universalist church of Elgin. Music by the M. E. choir.

      At the conclusion of the service at the church, the remains were tenderly laid to rest in the family lot, where the beautiful and impressive burial service of the Masonic order was given. The many lovely floral tributes attested the love and esteem in which he was held.

      The following appropriate line from Bryant were read by the officiating clergyman:

      I saw an aged man up on his bier,
      His hair was than and white, and (the rest is unreadable)

      ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      The letters below, written in 1868, 1869 and 1880 seem to indicate Samuel and Sally were still in New York in the late 1860s but the census report for the township of Algonquin, McHenry County, IL show Samuel and Sally living there in 1860. Their son, Melvin was born in April, 1858 in Illinois, probably in Algonquin.

      These letters were written by Charles Loghry to his son, William Henry Harrison Loghry. In them he mentions the mental condition of Samuel and that of his brother, William Henry Harrison Brown (Henry). Charles Loghry was married to Juliette Brown, sister to William and Samuel.


      Alens Station, N. Y. August 30, 68 (1868)

      Well henry it has bin some time sinse I have rote to you. We had A leter from you A short time a goe and was glad to hear that you and your family was well and was doing well.
      We are as usual working and tuging through this world and triing to git something to live on when we Cant work any more. We have had it very dry this sumer. Spring crops is very poor this year hear and as been as I can hear. Corn aint more than half a crop.
      When you git this you must tell us how times is with you. We had A good crop of hay and winter wheat but Barley and oats was lite this year potatoes is A lite crop I have a good croop of buckwheat.
      I am going to rite to franklin Loghry*. I begin to think that he has forgotten us it has ben A long time sinse he has rote to us. tell him to rite and let us noe what he is doing.
      We have had the hotest weather that was ever none in this country. it was so hot it was all most imposibel to work.
      I have sowed one peis of wheat and am redy to sow five acors more this week. I have had the falow ready two weeks.
      We are well to day and nobody but us two hear. Ada* is to sunday school while I am riting.
      You must come and make us a visit as soon as you can. You must rite as soon as you git this and let us noe how you git along.
      You must doe what you can for Seymour and Blain the Democrats will carie this state by A big majority as was ever nown.
      Give my respects to unkel Dar* and Lety* and all their fokes.
      Good by for this time
      to Henry Loghry and wife (signed

      Charles Loghry


      *1. Franklin Loghry is his son.
      2. Ada was a girl they had taken in to raise.
      3. Unkel Dar is Erasmus Darwin Brown, brother of Juliette Brown Loghry, and brother-in-law to Charles.
      4. Lety is Lettice Loghry Brown, a sister; one of the three Loghry Children to marry three Brown children.
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      Cameron, N.Y. Dec 26, 1869

      Well Henry it is some time sinse I have rote to you. I thout this morning I woud rite to you and let you noe that we are in the land of the living and as well as usual. I have in qite lame this fall and winter I have got A bad nee that is very lame and pains me very bad so that I cant sleep good nites. it was taken lame last summer and is giting worse. I have got most discourage of its ever giting any beter I haint ploud any this fall help is hard to git and wages is high hear.
      Comon labor is one dollar A day and bord and wheat is worth $1.00 for that is good
      You rote that you wanted me to send you some money that is out of the question this winter for money is hard to git and very scarce there is nothing that will fetch money hear.
      we have had some cold wether and good slaying But this warm today and raining there aint mutch going on this winter hear Sam Brown* has got home from the Asilum and seams to bee all rite he Chops wood evry day Brown's foxes* is well and doing well they are in the hoop pole business this winter
      Henry you must keep good Courage your young yet and you mustent git the horers for that dont doe any good if I was of your age and had my health I could live any where I think that I can doe as much as I ever could But when I goe to work I soon git tierd and soon think difernt I have worked this fall that when I got in the house and sot down I had all that I could doe to git up I have the rheumatism most all the time
      My nee pains me so that I can hardley rite while I am now riting
      We got a leter from your wife on Chrismuss for A Chrismuss present and was glad to hear that you was well and all the friends
      I wish that you was hear today to hellp us eat some Big Aples we have the Bigest Aples that you ever seen David Williamson was hear last sunday and he meshered one that was 14 inches round we have got 20 bushels of grafted aples in the seler
      Good By for this time rite soon as you git this
      We like to hear from you often as we can
      Direct to Alens Station
      (signed)
      C. Loghry
      * 1. folks
      2. Sam Brown is Samuel Right Brown, Jr.; a brother to Charles's first wife, Juliette.
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      Cameron, March 15, 1880

      Well Henry Loghry it has bin A long time since we have heard from you you dont rite very often and today I thaut that I woud rite you a few lines to let you noe that we are in the land of the living but not very smart this winter I have bin qite poorley this winter and lame not abel to doe my chores nor to cut my wood I am giting old and will soon be out of this world and it wont mater how qick if I am prepard for that day that day will surly come prepared or not Ada and her man is with us this winter and will stay with us this year or that is the talk now if nothing hapens. We have had A very warm winter and noe snow it has bin rather unheathy this winter. A grate many old fokes has dropt off this winter some without one moments warning there are several that has dropt dead seting their chair and it stands us in hand to be ready to meet to meet it if we never meet on this earth less try to meet in heaven your unkel Em Brown* is very poorley this winter he lais A bed the most of the time he haint bin from home in nine years he is nothing but skin and bones.
      the rest of the family is well but hard up this winter they had their barn burnd and all their hay and grain and it is touf for them this winter I hurd form you unkel Henry Brown* the other day he is bad off he dont noe hardly any thing and the man told me that they had lost ther property he thout it was all used up they sold out but dident saave mutch that is bad to loes his senses and property to. times is beter this spring that it has bin for sevel years past money is plenty and proptery is chang hands and things looks beter now than they have for some time
      Wheat is 140 rie 90 corn 65 oats 50 potatoes 40 Apels from 50 to 65
      hay is from $10 to $12 tone
      give my best Respects to all the frends and tell them that I would (like) to see them very much I would like to see you and your wife today and have you hear.
      tell Juliaette* to rite to us I will rite to her before long now Henry rite soon as you git this and till us how you are giting A long

      from your father
      (signed)
      Charles Loghry

      * 1. unkel Henry Brown is William Henry Harrison Brown, brother to Juliette, Charles' first wife.
      2. Juliaette is Charles'granddaughter by William Henry Harrison Loghry and Elizabeth Williams.

      * 5. In the above letters, it mentions that Samuel Right Brown, Jr. was still living in Cameron, NY in 1868. His arrival date in Illinois appears to be at a much later date. Membership in the Masonic Lodge was transferred to the Nunda Lodge in 1867. That date could be wrong.


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      Last Will and Testament of S. R. Brown, Sr. (Jr.) Deceased.
      Filed McHenry County, ILLS. Feb. 19, 1909, G. F. Rushton, Clerk County Court


      Know all men by these presents, that I, S. R. Brown Sr. of Cary Station, Illinois, being aged but of sound and disposing mind and memory, do make and publish this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all former wills by me at any time heretofore made.

      As to my worldly estate, Real or Personal I dispose thereof in the manner following--

      First my will is, that all my just debts and funeral expenses shall by my exectutors hereinafter named, be paid ou of my Estate as soon after my decease as shall be found by them convenient,

      Item- I give devise and bequeath my entire Estate to be divided equally between my sons S. R. Brown Jr., E. D. Brown, Melvin Brown, and D. M. Brown, and to my daughters Julia Brown, Martha Osgood, and Dora Raue and my Grandson Dexter D. Brown, share and share alike.

      In the event of the death of my son S. R. Brown, Jr. before my death the bequeath as relates to him shall be void and his daughter being my Grand daughter, Alice is to receive One Thousand ($1,000.00) Dollars.

      Lastly I do nominate and appoint my daughter Julia Brown, and my son E. D. Brown the executors of this my last Will and Testament.

      In testimony whereof, I the said S. R. Brown Sr. have to this my last Will and Testament contained on one sheet of paper, subscribed my name and affixed my seal this 14th. day of August A. D. 1906.

      S. R. Brown Sr. (Seal)


      Signed, sealed, published and delivered by the said S. R. Brown Sr. as and for his last will and testament in the presence of us who at his request, and in his presence and in the presence of each other, have subscribed our names as witnesses thereto.

      Luna E. Mentch, Cary Station, Illinois.
      Foy L. Mentch, Cary Station , Illinois.




      In the History of McHenry County, IL , Vol. 2, pp 497-98, the following but not intirely accurate:

      Samuel Right Brown, now deceased, was born at Bedford, Mass.,(he was born in Dresden, Yates Co., NY. His mother was born there) Nov. 17, 1817, and died at Cary, Ill., Februdary 2, 1908, having lived in retirement in that village for some seventeen years prior to his demise. He married at Bath, NY to Sallie Ann Cass (Coss), born June 3, 1817, at Bath, NY. After his marriage he came to Kankakee, IL. where a brother, Darien E. (Erasmus Darwin) Brown had already located, and about two years later, Samuel R. Brown came to McHenry County, to join Mrs. Brown's two sisters, Lucy, who was Mrs. A. L. Weaver; and Matilda, who was Mrs. David Miller, both of Algonquin Township, where their husbands had secured land from the government. Samuel R. Brown rented the farm he later bought, on which was an old house. It was partly covered with timber. He cleared off the land, drained it and put up a good set of buildings, to which a silo and other improvements have since been added. For years Mr. Brown made butter for private customers in addition to carrying on his farmings, becoming one of the well-known men of his community. On December 3, 1902, Mr. Brown had the misfortune to lose his wife. They were the parents of the following children: William C., who enlisted when only sixteen years old in Company I, Ninely-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under Captain James Nish, and he served through the Civil War, coming out of the conflict without any wounds but with his health so impaired that he died fifteen years later; Samuel K., (Samuel R., III) who is a well-known stockman, lives at Cary with his sister; Martha, who is the widow of Mark Osgood, also lives at Cary; Charlotte, who died at the age of eighteen years, had attended the academy at Elgin; Julia, who lives at Cary, is a very progressive lady, who during the World War was active in Red Cross work, and belongs to the Woman's Club, Royal Neighbors and Ladies' Aid Society; Darwin who is a prominent man and successful farmer of Lake County, IL; Melvin , who is deceased, was a prominent cement contractor, and passed away at Wancenda (Wauconda) IL in 1913; Daniel M., was a milk dealer of Chicago for some years, was educated in the Elgin Academy; and Dora, who married Ben Rand (Raue) of Crystal Lake, died when about fifty years of age. The Brown family is one of the best known ones in McHenry County, and its members during their long residence here have been connected with some of the most constructive work of their secation, and are recognized as being typical of the advanced spirit which seems to prevail in this poration of Illinois.
    Person ID I53063  Freeman-Smith
    Last Modified 7 Jul 2016 

    Father Brown Samuel Right (Wright),   b. 26 Sep 1775, Swanzey, Cheshire Co., NH Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Sep 1817, Near Cherry Valley, Otsego County, NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 41 years) 
    Relationship Natural 
    Mother Annable Eunice Mary,   b. 01 Apr 1780, New Bedford, Bristol Co., MA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Mar 1874, Torrey, Yates Co., NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 93 years) 
    Relationship Natural 
    Married 13 Feb 1803  Saratoga, Saratoga County, New York Find all individuals with events at this location  [1, 7
    Family ID F24157  Group Sheet

    Family Coss Sarah Ann,   b. 03 Jun 1817, Bath, Steuben Co., NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 01 Dec 1902, Cary Station, McHenry Co., IL Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 85 years) 
    Married 01 Jan 1844  Bath, Steuben Co., NY Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Children 
     1. Brown Charles L.,   b. 16 Dec 1845, Bath, Steuben Co., NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 17 Oct 1847, Bath, Steuben Co., NY Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 1 years)
     2. Brown III Samuel Right or Wright,   b. 18 Nov 1846, Bath, Steuben Co., NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Feb 1927, Wauconda, Lake County, IL Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
     3. Brown William C.,   b. 17 Apr 1847, Bath, Steuben Co., NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Apr 1879, Silver Lake, McHenry County, IL Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 32 years)
     4. Brown Martha Eunice,   b. 22 Feb 1850, Bath, Steuben Co., NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 03 Mar 1939, Cary, McHenry County, IL Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)
     5. Brown Charlotte,   b. 01 Mar 1851, Bath, Steuben Co., NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Jul 1872, Algonquin Township, McHenry County, Il Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 21 years)
     6. Brown Julia Ann,   b. 14 Jan 1854, Torrey, Yates Co., NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Mar 1922, Cary, McHenry County, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 68 years)
     7. Brown II Erasmus Darwin,   b. 15 Dec 1855, Torrey, Yates Co., NY Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Dec 1934, Chicago, Cook County, Il Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years)
     8. Brown Melvin,   b. 03 Apr 1858, St. Anne, Kankakee Co., IL Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Nov 1936, Wauconda, Lake County, Il Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years)
     9. Brown Daniel McCurdy,   b. 02 May 1860, Algonquin Township, Near North Crystal Lake, McHenry County, IL Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 11 Jan 1912, Cary Station, McHenry Co., IL Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 51 years)
     10. Brown Dora,   b. 05 May 1863, Cary, McHenry County, IL Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 18 Jan 1914, Crystal Lake, McHenry County, IL Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 50 years)
    Last Modified 7 Jul 2016 
    Family ID F24182  Group Sheet

  • Sources 
    1. [S1397] Merged from BrianFreeman on 01-Jan-13 at 22:11.

    2. [S1442] Letters from Charles L. Loghry to his son, William Henry Harrison Loghry, 1868-1880..

    3. [S1416] DuFrain-Loghry Ancestral Lineage and History,compiled by Viola DuFrain, dated August 1923..

    4. [S1495] History of McHenry County, IL, By special authors and contributors, (Munsell Publishing Company, Chicago, IL 1922), pp.497-98.
      This commentary in the History of McHenry County is not entirely accurate. Corrections are made in parentheses.

    5. [S1441] 1830 Federal Census for Cameron, Steuben County, NY, Enumerator: John Kennedy, (Microfilm # M19-107), page 366, line 5.
      Samuel was living with his brother, Charles Volney and the rest of his family in Cameron, Steuben County, NY. The mother, Eunice, was missing at the time of the census. Perhaps she was taking care of her widowed elderly father.

    6. [S1406] Family notes by Mary Elizabeth Loghry DuFrain, 1943..

    7. [S1501] According to a petition for land signed by Eunice (Hannibal) Brown, Hannah Castner and Wright Brown.


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